Tag Archives: south korea

Celebs take part in grisly dog meat protest


I’m the first to agree that there should be no punches pulled when exposing atrocities against animals, and dogs in particular, but an animal rights group went a step too far in a Los Angeles protest in which celebrities held up animal corpses.

“Actual dead dogs” is how some media reports described the canine corpses displayed by actresses Priscilla Presley, E.G. Daily and Donna D’Errico in the Tuesday protest against dog meat consumption in South Korea.

The dead dogs weren’t victims of Korea’s dog meat trade, but were recently euthanized dogs on loan from a local veterinarian.

Last Chance for Animals, the organization behind the protest, was aiming for shock value, and got it — but it was an unnecessary and tasteless display.

Unnecessary, because the horrid realities of the Korean dog meat trade are bad enough, and easy enough to show people. Resorting to rounding up deceased family pets to hold up before the TV cameras was a tasteless stunt that was off the mark, went overboard and smacked of deception.

The celebrities were given gloves to wear while handling the carcasses, and the dogs used in the protest were reportedly going to be “respectfully cremated” upon its conclusion.

Wearing a “stop dog meat” t-shirt over white scrubs, Presley held a dead dog in her arms as she stood outside the Consulate General of the Republic of Korea in Los Angeles. D’Errico and Daly also held dog corpses, while actress Kim Basinger held a sign depicting three dead dogs hanging from wires — an actual photo, from actual Korea.

The latter made sense; using dead American pets did not.

The protest one of three held Tuesday across the globe. Similar demonstrations took place in Washington D.C. and Seoul, according to Last Chance for Animals.

Tuesday was the beginning of Bok Nal — known as the three hottest days of the Korean summer. Dog meat consumption rises exponentially this time of year in S. Korea as dog meat soup, known as Boshintang, is still viewed by some as a way to combat the extreme heat and humidity.

In reality, the consumption of dog meat is steadily decreasing in South Korea and only older generations are still eating it.

Nevertheless, the Animal Welfare Institute in Washington, D.C., estimates South Koreans slaughter an estimated 2 million dogs for human consumption each year, and Humane Society International estimates that 30 million dogs around the world are killed for food each year.

It’s cruel. It’s wrong. It’s exploitation. And there are many ways to fight it.

Seeking out dogs who died for totally unrelated reasons and holding their bodies in front of TV cameras should not be one of them, because it, too, reeks of exploitation.

(Photos: People.com)

Korean court says killing dogs to sell their meat is illegal

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A South Korean court has ruled that killing dogs to sell their meat is illegal, but that’s not likely to serve as an immediate reprieve for any of the one to two million dogs slaughtered each year.

Nevertheless, the first of its kind ruling is a step toward outlawing the dog-meat trade in South Korea — one of several Asian countries where the practice, though fading, continues.

The Humane Society International estimates that 30 million dogs a year are killed for food around the world.

The court’s decision was reached in April but not widely known until details were released at the end of June, National Geographic reported.

The decision ruled in favor of the animal rights activist group Coexistence of Animal Rights on Earth, or CARE, which sued a dog-farm owner in Bucheon, South Korea, last year for “killing animals without proper reason,” according to Agence France-Presse.

The Bucheon city court convicted the owner on the basis that meat consumption was not a legal reason to kill dogs. The court also said he violated building and hygiene regulations that authorities put in place to crack down on dog-meat farms. The owner was fined three million won (about $2,700 US) and waived his right to an appeal.

“It is very significant in that it is the first court decision that killing dogs for dog meat is illegal itself,” Kim Kyung-eun, a lawyer for CARE, told the Guardian.

The precedent “paved the way for outlawing dog meat consumption entirely”, she added, saying CARE planned to file complaints against “many more” dog farmers.

A lawmaker from the ruling Democratic Party has introduced a bill to the National Assembly to ban dog meat consumption.

Owners of dog farms and slaughterhouses are protesting the ruling.

“Cows, pigs, chickens, and ducks are all raised to be consumed,” said Cho Hwan-ro, a representative from an association of dog farms, on YTN television. “Why not dogs?”

Cho said there are some 17,000 dog farms across the country, and that the government should legalize and license them. “Otherwise,” he said, “we’ll fight to the end.”

Eating dog meat is a fading practice in South Korea, engaged in mostly by older citizens. Younger generations steer clear of dog-meat consumption, adopting the view that dogs are pets, not food.

(Photo: Dogs look out from cages at a dog farm during a rescue event on the outskirts of Seoul in 2017; by JUNG YEON-JE, AFP/GETTY)

Push to ban dog farms in South Korea continues after the Olympics spotlight fades

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The Olympics are long over in South Korea, but the push to get the country to ban farms where dogs are bred for human consumption, continues — and with a few positive developments.

A new bill, introduced to the National Assembly earlier this month by Lee Sang-don, a member of the Bareunmirae party, would remove the legal basis for factory-style mass breeding of dogs, reported the Korea Times.

Animal Liberation Wave, an animal rights group that launched a campaign against the farms in January, praises the introduction of the bill.

“There are more than 3,000 dog farms where a million dogs get slaughtered every year,” it said in a statement this week. “We hope the bill will become a law to take the first step to end the dog meat industry in Korea.”

The campaign seeks to ban the production and consumption of dog meat and to have dogs legally defined as companions only.

It is still legal to breed dogs to sell their meat in South Korea — and to consume it — as long as the animals are not killed in open areas.

The practice of eating dog meat has been declining, and younger Koreans are generally opposed to it.

But the tradition continues among older people, many of whom believe dog meat aids their virility.

Under livestock industry law, farmers can pursue profit with livestock, which includes dogs and many other animals. But according to the Livestock Processing Act, dogs are not categorized as livestock.

As a result of that, dog meat cannot be traded through major distribution channels like other meat. Instead it is most often sold directly to restaurants, or at outdoor markets.

According to the Seoul Metropolitan Government, the number of restaurants serving dog meat soup, known as “bosintang,” decreased from 528 in 2005 to 329 in 2014.

Regardless, the ALW says, there are still up to 3,000 dog meat farms operating in the country, where more than a million are raised each year, only to be slaughtered for their meat.

The Animal Liberation Wave (ALW), in partnership with the international animal rights organization Last Chance for Animals (LCA), launched a global campaign to ban dog meat from South Korea. The campaign started with a website, petition page (www.donghaemul.com/stopdogmeat) and video against dog meat.

Jiyen Lee, the founder of ALW, said, “there has been a tendency in this country to consider the dog meat issue as a matter of personal choice when in fact it is the government who is hugely responsible for exacerbating the problem by failing to formulate social consensus.

“It is high time that a change is made to fit the current Korean society where 1 out of 5 nationals are living with dogs as companions.”

As part of the campaign, a “Flower Dog Project” is underway, featuring 8 dog statues that will appear in major cities.

(Image, from the Flower Dog Project, via Animal Liberation Wave)

Bill to prohibit eating dog and cat makes gains in Congress


Lawmakers in Washington are pushing ahead with legislation that would ban the eating of dog and cat meat in the U.S.

The Dog and Cat Meat Trade Prohibition Act of 2017, first introduced in March, has 100 co-sponsors and has been referred to a House Agriculture subcommittee.

Introduced by Reps. Alcee Hastings (D-Fla.) and Vern Buchanan (R-Fla.), it would amend the federal Animal Welfare Act to establish legal standards against selling dog and cat meat, currently allowed in 44 states.

“We are very happy to have the support of so many activists who have taken up this issue with their own members of Congress,” Hastings told The Hill Thursday.

jindolBackers of the bill hope that it fills gaps in the animal protection law, and sends a message to Asian countries where dog meat is still consumed, including South Korea and China, where the annual Yulin festival in China sees thousands of dogs and cats are publicly killed and skinned, and their meat marketed for human consumption.

Animal rights activists are hoping publicity about the upcoming festival will provide momentum to the bill in Congress, and that the bill, similarly, will fuel opposition to the festival.

“I think that some people initially considered the idea of killing dogs for meat far-fetched,” Wayne Pacelle, president and CEO of the Humane Society of the United States, told The Hill. “But the very real butchering of dogs in Yulin reminds people that it is a very serious and disturbing issue.”

Earlier this year, Rep. Hastings introduced a resolution condemning the festival, which now has 166 co-sponsors from both parties.

While dog meat consumption in the U.S. is limited, most states still allow dogs to be raised and sold for meat. Only California, Georgia, Hawaii, Michigan, New York and Virginia have banned such practices.

(Photos: At top, dogs awaiting slaughter at a street market near Seoul; lower, my favorite meat dog, Jinjja, rescued from a dog meat farm in South Korea; photos by John Woestendiek)

Chinese scientists clone dogs with heart disease — and call it an achievement

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China says it has managed to join South Korea as a world leader in canine cloning — by managing to create a clone of a sick dog.

Longlong, a beagle, was born with a blood-clotting disorder, and that was just what the scientists were hoping for.

The pup is a clone of Apple, a different dog whose genome was edited to develop the disease atherosclerosis, CNN reported.

longlong1By cloning the bioengineered dog, the scientists ensured they will have a good supply of diseased dogs for experiments they say could lead to cures for the condition that causes strokes and heart disease in humans.

Longlong was created by the Beijing-based biotech company Sinogene, which is boasting about having created the world’s first dog cloned from a gene-edited donor.

With Longlong’s birth, and two more clones of the bio-engineered dog being born since then, the scientists claimed that China had matched South Korea as a leader in canine cloning technology. South Korean scientists cloned the first dog, an Afghan hound named Snuppy, in 2005.

“Dogs share the most inheritable diseases with human beings, which makes them the best disease models to study,” says Feng Chong, technical director at Sinogene.

While the pups haven’t shown any signs of cardiovascular disease yet, their cloning ensures they will get it. Experimental drugs to treat cardiovascular diseases are already being tested on them.

Longlong’s birth combined two technologies: A gene-editing tool called CRISPR with somatic cell cloning technology, the method used to clone Dolly the sheep and later, Snuppy.

Zhao Jianping, vice manager of Sinogene, says the company’s success in dog cloning is about 50%. Two surrogate dogs out of four gave birth to three cloned puppies. The other two did not get pregnant.

Scientists at Sinogene believe their work aids the future of pharmaceutical development and biomedical research and it plans to produce more cloned dogs like Longlong.

“Gene-edited dogs are very useful for pharmaceutical companies,” said Feng. “The supply falls short of the demand every year.”

(Poor little pharmaceutical companies.)

The scientists also say cloning bio-engineered dogs to create puppy clones that will be born with the disease is kinder than the previous method of creating atherosclerosis in lab dogs — namely, force feeding with meals high in sugar.

Scientists, in case you haven’t noticed, have also invented a way to justify just about anything they want to do.

So if you want to hail this as a great achievement in technology, go ahead. I prefer to see it as scientists taking another giant stride toward playing God — giveth-ing life to dogs, only to taketh it away. Mankind may benefit (or at least live a longlong time), but rest assured the biggest gains will go to pharmaceutical companies.

(Photos: CNN)

Korean Jindo mix lost by Wag! walker is back home safely in New York

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I can attest that a loose Jindo — at least one who has been rescued from a South Korean dog meat farm — can be hard to recapture when it gets off the leash.

Now Wag! — the app that has been called the “Uber of dog-walking” — can too.

The two-week search for Teddy, a 4-year-old black Jindo mix, saw the company use drones, hire Jindo experts and procure the services of a professional trapper.

Teddy is now back home safe after being lured into a cage containing hot dogs treated with Liquid Smoke at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden Sunday.

“She’s good!” Teddy’s owner Kane Giblin said. “Her paws are a little beat up, and she has a tick and has lost a little weight, but she’s doing alright.”

Teddy, like my Jindo, Jinjja, was rescued from a dog meat farm in South Korea and brought to the U.S. for adoption.

jindolJinjja has escaped four times. It’s a function of nature and nurture (or their lack thereof in dog farms). The breed is notorious for escaping.

And, with dog farm dogs, once they do escape, they are off — not heeding calls to come back, or offers of a snack. On dog farms, coming when called is unlikely to result in a positive outcome. So once loose, they get in a wild dog frame of mind, and the harder you try to catch them, the harder they become to catch.

Jinjja is a sweet and otherwise normal dog, who will come to me when called while in the house. If he’s outside, and gets off the leash, it’s another story. Can that be overcome? Stay tuned.

giblinandteddyKane Giblin adopted Teddy after the Jindo-Lab mix was rescued from a South Korean dog meat farm in May.

The dog managed to get free while on a stroll in Prospect Park on Nov. 30 with a Wag! dog walker.

After nearly two weeks of roaming, Teddy was spotted Sunday morning in a trap set by by trappers hired by Wag.

A Brooklyn Botanic Gardens employee notified Giblin by text that she’d been recaptured.

They’d baited the cage with hot dogs and liquid smoke to lure Teddy, the New York Daily News reported.

Wag! had taken other steps to find the dog, including setting up a special hotline and hiring workers to hang missing dog flyers. It used drones to search for the dog aerially, and it hired a Jindo expert who brought in her own Jindos to help track Teddy.

Giblin says she appreciates the efforts Wag! made in locating Teddy, but that she’s no longer comfortable using the service.

A Wag! spokeswoman said in a statement, “We are delighted that Teddy is back home with [her] owner, safe and in good health.”​

Teddy’s escape isn’t the first time a Wag! walker lost a dog. Buddy, a Beagle-Lab mix, escaped in September while his owners were on vacation. And a Brooklyn Chihuahua named Duckie went missing in 2015, and was fatally hit by a car.

Dog and turkey, rescued from becoming dinner, have a happy Thanksgiving

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A dog and a turkey, both rescued from farms where they were being raised to become meat, will spend this Thanksgiving hiking in Northern Virginia.

Blossom is a foster turkey, taken in by Abbie Hubbard, who is deputy director of the Animal Welfare League of Alexandria, after the five-week-old bird was rescued from a slaughterhouse.

Once in her home, Blossom quickly bonded with Minnow, Hubbard’s dog, who was rescued from a dog farm in South Korea. Minnow was one of 23 farm dogs who were brought to Northern Virginia by Humane Society International (HSI) in 2015.

Blossom is just the latest rescued farm animal Minnow has helped Hubbard foster since then.

When Blossom first arrived, Hubbard said, Minnow “went right up to her in a very soft, kind manner. She nudged her and kissed her and then led her to the living room.”

dogturkey2They’ve been inseparable since. They take naps together, hike together and greeted trick-or-treaters together on Halloween, both dressed in Wonder Woman costumes.

“I believe a turkey, or any animal, can nourish our souls far more than any meal ever could,” Hubbard, 40, told Today.com.

Today, all three also enjoy a “plant-based” Thanksgiving dinner. “Blossom and Minnow both love veggies so there will be plenty,” Hubbard said.

Blossom will be leaving Hubbard’s home and going to Burgundy Farm, a school that is also a home for animals.

Even after that, Hubbard plans to pick Blossom up on Sundays for hikes with Minnow.

“Minnow and Blossom remind me every day there is no greater gift in life than love,” she said. “That’s Thanksgiving to me.”

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(Photos by Abbie Hubbard, via Today.com)