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Tag: spain

Dog performing CPR? Not really

To hear some websites tell it, this police dog is actually performing CPR on this fellow officer.

The video was released on Twitter last week by the Municipal Police of Madrid, but the staged demonstration was more an attempt to draw “awwwwwws” than portray any reality.

In the video, an officer drops to the ground, landing on his back. An announcer calls for help and a K-9 responder named Poncho runs to his side, jumping up and down on the officer’s chest.

It may look like he’s performing compression techniques, and checking to see if the officer is breathing, but those are all tricks he has been taught.

Impressive, but not life-saving.

Of course, as with so many viral videos, we don’t always learn the facts until long after the myth they are perpetuating spreads across the globe. The video has been viewed more than 2 millions times.

The Washington Post pointed out the video shows a dog mimicking CPR, not performing it:

Poncho’s performance was a well-done “trick” but not really a first-aid technique, said Ronnie Johnson, lead trainer at Global Training Academy, a training center for K-9s in Somerset, Tex. Police dogs can be taught to do a variety of things, but CPR isn’t one of them. “I don’t think a dog could actually do CPR,” Johnson said, explaining that the lifesaving measure requires precision and strength …

Jonathan Epstein, senior director of science and government relations for the Red Cross, said the video is “cute” but “from a medical perspective, it’s not truly providing CPR.”

Madrid police, in tweeting the video, did little to point out it was all a trick, writing that the “heroic” police dog, named Poncho, “did not hesitate for a moment to ‘save the life’ of the agent.

Concrete dogs in Barcelona send a message

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Twenty concrete dogs have been tethered to signs, lamposts, park benches and bicyle racks in Barcelona, Spain, as part of an effort to call attention to the problem of abandoned pets.

About 1,400 pets, including 760 dogs, were discarded on the streets of Barcelona last year — a 13 percent increase from 2016 — prompting the city council to launch the campaign.

Called “Dogs S.O.S.,” the campaign hopes to both raise awareness of the issue and help find homes for the 200 dogs awaiting adoption in city shelters.

The city contracted with the advertising firm Ogilvy Barcelona to place 20 life-sized concrete dog statues — cast from 3-D printed molds — around town, tethered to posts, poles and other urban structures.

Each statue includes an ID tag with a code that links to the City Council’s animal welfare site, where viewers can get information about dogs in need of homes.

Two shelter dogs — a 4-year-old mixed-breed named Neula and a 5-year-old American Staffordshire named Samó –served as models for the statues, ADWEEK reported.

“Neula and Samsó represent all the dogs that have been waiting a second chance,” said Jofre Banquells, creative director of Ogilvy Barcelona. “They both waited for at least a year at Barcelona’s animal shelter. Fortunately, Neula has been quickly adopted as soon as the campaign has been launched (on April 9).”

“Installing the dogs attached to lampposts, as if they were really abandoned, helps people visualize the situation,” Banquells said. “People don’t only see a dog, they see the problem. In addition, it gained media attention with no investment at all.”

The sculptures will stay on the streets another week, then be moved to other public spaces, such as libraries.

(Photo: Ogilvy Barcelona)

More mistreated greyhounds — in Spain

America isn’t the only country where greyhounds are exploited and mistreated.

We may have our racing tracks, and those blood farms, but there is some even more horrendous treatment of greyhounds going on in Spain, where more than 50,000 galgos, or Spanish greyhounds, are destroyed each year — most often in cruel fashion.

Spanish greyhouds come from different lineage than American greyhounds, but they are very similar and have the same shy, sweet and gentle dispositions.

In parts of Spain, they are used for hunting, but when they start to slow down, they are cruelly disposed of by some Spanish hunters, or “galgueros” — at a rate of about 50,000 per year.

Most of the dogs, called “galgos,” are used for one or two years and then discarded, and those who perform poorly are often tortured to death

The Spanish government has mostly ignored the issue, but perhaps an upcoming documentary, now in editing, will cause enough of a stir to lead it to take some action.

“YO GALGO is a feature film about life and traditions in the villages, about an invisible genocide taking place while the authorities look the other way,” the maker of the movie says on its website. “It’s about the tireless people working to rescue these dogs, and about the new and modern Spain versus the conservative and traditional one.”

Yeray Lopez Portillo describes the documentary as “an investigative feature film that paints a picture of the consequences of these hobbies for hundreds of thousands of galgos. It shows us a glimpse into human nature through the use of these dogs; the abuse, the tradition and the silence kept by people and institutions about it. A clash between the modern and old Spain.”

His kickstarter campaign explains:

“Every year healthy galgos are killed, beaten to death, drowned or abandoned when they no longer live up to their owners’ expectations. The breeders, the so called galgueros, breed hoping to end up with the fastest dog to compete and hunt the hare, but overbreeding leads to the ‘throwing out’ of thousands and thousands of galgos every year.”

Those who have proved to be good hunters are taken to shelters to be euthanized when they’ve lost their edge. Those who have not face being burned with acid, dragged behind cars, sacrificed to fighting dogs, skinned alive and buried alive.

The most famous torture is called the “piano dance,” which involves hanging the dog by the neck with the feet just touching the ground as it struggles to breathe until it is strangled to death by its own movements.

As explained in an article in The Dodo, the breeders and hunters maintain the torturing “washes away the dishonor” of having a dog with poor hunting skills.

Because the galgos are regarded under Spanish law as working dogs, they are excluded from the laws relating to pets.

The Spanish government did pass laws in 2004 concerning abuses and neglect, but they have not been used to prosecute anyone.

Hunting with greyhounds also takes place in Portugal, Northern Ireland and in the United Kingdom, but the cruelest abuses are in Spain.

For more information, visit galgorescue.org or the Yo Galgo Facebook page.

Who stole the giant turd of Torrelodones?

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Officials in Torrelodones, a town outside Spain’s capital of Madrid, are scratching their heads after someone made off with a giant inflatable replica of dog poop — a municipally-sanctioned artwork (and we use the term loosely) intended to remind citizens to pick up after their dogs.

The victim, when on display, is brown, nearly 10 feet high, and weighs about 65 pounds.

Once the air is let out, it is small enough to be packed in a carrying case, which is the condition it was in when someone walked off with it.

The town says it will cost more than $2,700 to replace.

Speaking to the ABC newspaper, a town official said staff were shocked and perplexed by the theft, and a replacement excrement was already on order because “we know that the campaign has been a great success.”

No word on how long it may take for that to come to pass.

Nor is there any mention of a ransom note being sent by those who pinched it.

The inflatable poop is one of several symbols being used in the municipality’s “Lay an egg” campaign. Torrelodones has also placed concrete dog poops around town bearing the message “This is a big blockage to living together. If you have a dog, help us.”

Should an arrest be made, we think the suspect would be able to put on a pretty good defense.

After all, he or she was only doing — albeit on a far larger scale — what the campaign urges.

In Spain, owners who don’t pick up after dogs may end up cleaning the streets

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Dog owners whose pets soil the streets of Madrid could soon find themselves cleaning those streets.

City officials unveiled their “shock plan” this week, saying those who do not clean up after their dogs in the Spanish capital will have to either pay a fines up to $1,700 — or go to work as street cleaners.

Municipal police will test the scheme in the two city districts where un-scooped dog poop seems to be the biggest problem, according to The Guardian.

Madrid and other Spanish cities have been cracking down on scofflaws for years now.

Last year the city of Tarragona announced it would use DNA analysis of dog droppings to track down owners who fail to clean up after them.

El Vendrell, a small town of 36,000 people in northeastern Spain, has tried setting up a canine toilet along one of its main thoroughfares.

And in the town of Brunete a few years ago, volunteers who spotted scofflaws struck up friendly conversations with them, obtaining enough information for city officials to identify them and send them a package marked “Lost Property.” Inside, they would find … you guessed it.

Madrid has launched repeated public awareness campaigns over the years, aimed at getting a handle on the problem, and it has distributed millions of free poop bags.

But, “there is still excrement in the streets, parks and other places,” the city said. Under the new plan, dog owners will have only one way of avoiding the hefty fine — by performing street cleaning duties for a few days.

The number of hours they are required to put in would be based on the size of the fine, the city says.

(Photo: TNT Magazine via The Guardian)

Spanish nurse learns she’s cured of Ebola — but that her dog is dead

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The Spanish nursing assistant whose dog was exterminated after she was found to have contracted Ebola from a patient has been pronounced free of the virus.

But along with the good news, Teresa Romero has learned what the rest of the world has known for two weeks.

Her dog Excalibur was seized, killed and incinerated days after she was diagnosed after officials hastily pronounced him a health risk — despite no evidence the dog had the disease, and over the objections of family members and protesters.

excal3Her husband, Javier Limón, who has been held in the same hospital for monitoring, says Romero has been informed the dog is dead — a fact that was withheld from her during her two weeks of treatment.

“She is asking herself why they killed the dog, who wasn’t to blame for anything,” Limón told EL PAIS.

Limón, staying in a room a floor below his wife at Madrid’s Carlos III Hospital, said he and his wife are pleased with her recovery, but frustrated by what happened to Excalibur, and by  how Romero was criticized by health officials for not following proper hospital protocol.

“I couldn’t fight when they killed the dog and I couldn’t defend my wife when they said all those lies and slanderous things about her,” he said.

excalRomero, 44, is expected to be monitored in the hospital for two more weeks, Limón, who has shown no signs of the virus, for another week. The couple has no children.

Romero tested positive Oct. 6 after coming in contact with Spain’s first Ebola patient.

As part of her treatment, she received plasma from a recovered Ebola patient, but health authorities have disclosed no more treatment details, according to NBC.

Just two days after she was diagnosed with the disease, health officials had her large mixed breed dog, Excalibur, seized, killed and incinerated out of fear he might have gotten the disease.

Meanwhile, in the U.S., Bentley, the first dog of an American Ebola patient, is being held in quarantine and tested regularly. The Cavalier King Charles spaniel shows no signs of the disease, officials say,.

Bentley is being cared for at the Hensley Field Services Center, a former military reserve base in southwest Dallas. He will continue to be tested and monitored until at least early next month.

Dogs and Ebola: Looking for answers

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You’d think in a world preparing for Ebola — especially in a country as sophisticated, dog-crazy and health-oriented as ours — someone would have given it at least a moment’s thought.

You’d think — between all the agencies and organizations, protocols and precautions; between the National Institutes for Health, the Centers for Disease Control and the American Veterinary Medical Association — someone somewhere would have stood up and said, hey, what about our dogs?

Instead, with Ebola’s spread to countries outside Africa, public health officials find themselves scratching their heads and — even though there’s no proof yet that dogs can transmit the disease — considering options as drastic as incarceration and extermination for the pets of humans diagnosed with Ebola.

Caution, of course, is good, but planning would have been better.

Excalibur was the first one to come to light. The large mixed-breed dog belonged to a nurse in Madrid who contracted the disease from Spain’s first Ebola patient. Her dog, over the family’s objections, was killed and incinerated nearly immediately upon the order of government officials.

America, or at least Dallas, took a more compassionate approach when a local nurse was determined to have contracted Ebola from a patient being treated in a hospital there. Bentley, her Cavalier King Charles spaniel, was moved into a quarantined area at a decommissioned Naval base, where he’s being tended to by hazardous material crews in full protective garb.

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Bentley

The question arises, and should have arisen long ago: What are we going to do with the pets of Ebola victims?

Will we turn to extermination, as the number of cases, and our fears, increase?

Will we keep them isolated in crates, bubbles or decommissioned military bases?

For how long? At what costs? Under whose supervision? And is it even necessary?

No one knows the answers to any of those questions, and the fear and uncertainty that ignorance leads to is bound to take us to some bad places, if it hasn’t already.

In an ideal world, we’d have studies to turn to — proving, one way or the other, whether dogs can contract and transmit the virus. We’d be testing them, as we do humans, before quarantining them, or at least before releasing them from that quarantine. We’d know how long, if at all, they need to be sequestered and monitored.

Instead, we’re playing a messy game of catch-up, and the argument can be made that it’s because we were wearing blinders.

Even in this supposed era of increased awareness about the health issues that cross species lines, our planet seems to once again have gotten caught up in the view that only humans matter.

Perhaps too it could be argued that, among many in America, some strange disease in Africa didn’t strike us as a big concern, or as an opportunity to learn and prepare for what might be coming. (Maybe we humans don’t like to look at the big picture when the big picture is too big, and too scary.)

What is abundantly clear is that no one, up until now, gave much thought to how Ebola might affect our dogs — if not the disease itself, at least the fear of it.

No one knows whether dogs can get the full-fledged virus. One study during the 2001-02 Ebola outbreak in Gabon showed some exposed dogs carried signs of infection, and had an immune response — but that’s not the same as getting the disease.

“Studies have shown that dogs can have an immune response to Ebola, but there have been no reports of pet dogs or cats becoming sick with Ebola or of passing the disease to other animals or people,” said Kristen Nordlund, a CDC health-communications specialist.

“In a situation where there is a dog or cat in the home of an Ebola patient, CDC recommends public-health officials evaluate the animal’s risk of exposure,” she added.

Given dogs are present in nearly half of American homes, given many of them share our beds and lick our faces, we’d like to see the CDC recommending something more than “risk evaluation.”

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Excalibur

Between the lack of knowledge, and the lack of a clear-cut recommended response when it comes to the pets of Ebola victims, public fears will only snowball as questions go unanswered.

Why, given all our physiological similarities, can’t the dogs of Ebola patients be tested like humans are to confirm if they’ve been exposed? And if, as limited study suggests, dogs can have the virus without getting sick and dying, might there be something worth further studying in that?

“We know that you and your clients are looking for answers, and we’re working to get information for you,” the American Veterinary Medical Association says on its website.

“The AVMA is collaborating with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and USDA along with other agencies and experts and is tapping into the broad expertise of our member veterinarians to develop information for our members and the public. We will strive to ensure that veterinarians have a prominent voice as these issues are discussed and decided in the U.S.”

Up until now, the CDC has taken the line that the risk of Ebola to pets is low. Its website also says there is little risk of an Ebola outbreak in the U.S.

“The risk of an Ebola outbreak affecting multiple people in the United States is very low,” says a question and answer fact sheet on the CDC website.. “Therefore, the risk to pets is also very low, as they would have to come into contact with blood and body fluids of a person with Ebola. Even in areas in Africa where Ebola is present, there have been no reports of dogs and cats becoming sick with Ebola.”

And yet Excalibur is dead and Bentley is being treated as hazardous material, and with each new case there will be new fears and ripples.

In Madrid, a dog that often played with Excalibur was surrendered to a shelter by his owners because of fears he might have contracted the disease.

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Tronco

Tronco was dropped off by his owners at the Spanish animal charity Escuela Canina Esga in Madrid, according to the New York Post.

“They were parents with young children and they just were not prepared to take the risk and so [they] handed him over to us,” said manager Esga Juan Esteban. “We did everything we could to reassure them that it was probably OK, but of course we couldn’t guarantee that the animal didn’t have Ebola, and so they were adamant that they didn’t want him any longer.”

The shelter, in its effort (successful) to find Tronco a new home, used only photos of him as a pup — so that, once he was adopted, he wouldn’t be recognized in public as a dog who once played with a dog whose owner has Ebola.

(Top photo: The image of Soviet Space dog Belka is from the distant past, but might we see something like it in the near future?)