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Tag: spots

Owners spot their lost dog in TV news report about a high speed chase

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Imagine, after your dog goes missing, spotting her on the evening news.

That’s how a San Diego area family learned that their missing pit bull, Catalina, had been recovered by authorities — but not until after being shot during a high speed chase that ended with a crash.

The nine-month-old puppy had gone missing just after Thanksgiving.

A few days later, a neighbor told Salina Hurtado’s husband that he thought he saw Catalina on the news, and gave them a few details from the news report.

The couple quickly Googled “pit bull shot in Valley Center” and watched this report on CBS News 8’s website:

Catalina had been in a stolen van that was being pursued by sheriff’s deputies. The van nearly ran over a few deputies, leading them to fire shots, before it crashed into a patrol car.

After arresting the driver, they tended to the dog’s gunshot injury, which was minor.

Footage of the incident shows the mostly white pit bull excitedly licking the face of the deputy who was carrying her.

“I couldn’t believe it,” Hurtado told the San Diego Union-Tribune. “I remember thinking, ‘My poor baby got into a high-speed chase? Is this for real?’ But I knew it was her.”

After viewing the report, Hurtado called the television station and was referred to San Diego County Animal Services shelter in Carlsbad.

She found her dog there, but hasn’t yet been able to reclaim Catalina.

The arrested driver, Kevin Meza, had told deputies the dog was his, and, since Catalina wasn’t licensed or microchipped, he has two weeks to prove Catalina belongs to him, said the director of the county’s animal services department.

Hurtado said she doesn’t know Meza.

Hurtado’s family has started a GoFundMe account to help with the medical bills they expected to receive for Catalina’s treatment.

(Photo: Catalina, at left, lounging with her brother, Capone; courtesy of Salina Hurtado)

In “Isle of Dogs,” canines in a Japanese city are banished to an island of trash

Director Wes Anderson has been secretive about the plot of his new animated movie, “Isle of Dogs,” but judging from a trailer released last week it will be trademark Anderson — bleakly beautiful, deceptively sentimental, more than a little haunting, and unconventional, with a capital UN.

It is set, 20 years from now, in a Japanese city, where canine overpopulation and an outbreak of dog flu has led the local government to banish dogs to an island filled with trash.

A 12-year-old boy hijacks a plane and flies to the island in search of his dog, Spots, and so begins an epic quest (is there any other kind these days?) in which he is assisted by five other exiled dogs (all of whom speak, of course).

“We’ll find him,” one of the dogs reassure the boy. “Wherever he is. If he’s alive. We’ll find your dog.”

It remains to be seen how family friendly the film will be, and whether it, like many other Anderson films, will have dogs dying off as the plot unwinds.

The movie is Anderson’s first feature since 2014’s “The Grand Budapest Hotel.”

Its cast of voice actors includes Bryan Cranston, Edward Norton, Jeff Goldblum, Frances McDormand, F. Murray Abraham, Tilda Swinton, Bill Murray, Courtney B. Vance, Harvey Keitel, Scarlett Johansson and Yoko Ono.

The film is scheduled to hit theaters in March, 2018.