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Tag: storm

Who needs Disney World when 900 dogs are staying at your hotel?

irma3

If you passed through the lobby of Orlando’s Hyatt Regency a week ago, you might have thought the Westminster Dog Show had a new home.

The hotel estimates it had between 800 and 900 canine guests over the weekend — the vast majority of them belonging to families that were fleeing Hurricane Irma.

irmaAs the hurricane struck Florida’s southern tip, and then its western shores, many residents headed north or east to Orlando for safety and sought refuge in the dog-friendly hotel.
The hotel wasn’t doing anything as noble as offering free shelter, though.

To say it “opened its heart” to evacuees and their dogs — as some reports have put it — is a bit of a leap.

But it did offer paying guests with dogs a break on its normal $150 cleaning fee, dropping it to (an almost reasonable) $50.

irma2Judging from photos of guests and their dogs that were posted on Instagram, the hotel maybe also have relaxed its 50-pound weight limit.

Most of the dogs belonged to families fleeing the hurricane, the Orlando Sentinel reported. But others belonged to families on vacation who either planned to bring their dogs along or brought them along at the last minute, not wanting to leave them behind in kennels when a hurricane was approaching.

The hotel also designated a few areas closer to the hotel entrance where dogs could relieve themselves that were partially sheltered from the wind and rain.

(Photos: Instagram)

Long Island dog pulls deer out of the sound

An English golden retriever out for a walk along the Long Island Sound saw something flailing in the water, swam out to it, and hauled a young deer back to shore by the scruff of its neck.

Mark Freeley was walking his two dogs, Storm and Sarah, when Storm sprang into action and pulled the fawn ashore.

Once on the sand the fawn got to its feet ran a few steps before collapsing. At that point, Storm layed down beside it, nudged it with his nose and began pawing it until it responded.

Freeley captured the incident on video (above), narrating as he filmed and shouting “Storm bring him in … Good boy Storm, bring him in.” He sounded 95 percent sure Storm’s intention was to rescue the young deer, and apparently it was.

Whether the deer wanted to be rescued was another question. After Storm had pulled the deer out of the water and a representative of a wildlife rescue organization arrived, the deer darted back into the water.

This time it went out even deeper, and the second rescue required two humans and some rope.

floridiaFreeley and Frank Floridia (at left) of Strong Island Rescue took part in phase two of the rescue, roping the deer and hauling it back to shore again.

A veterinarian called to the beach in Port Jefferson transported the deer to his office in his car.

The fawn is expected to make a full recovery before being released into the wild.

Freeley posted his video of Storm in action on Facebook Sunday.

“Storm just plunged into the water and started swimming out to the fawn, grabbed it by the neck, and started swimming to shore,” Freeley told CBS in New York.

“And then he started nudging it, and started paw it to make sure she was gonna be OK I guess,” he added.

The deer was one of two to make the news yesterday. In North Carolina, a deer broke into, of all places, a taxidermy shop in Walnut Cove. The deer crashed through the front door of the shop, which was closed for the night. There was some speculation that it went into the shop after seeing other deer — or at least their heads mounted on walls — inside.

(Video courtesy of Mark Freeley, photo of Frank Floridia supplied by Floridia, via New York Daily News)

Dog and cheetah enjoy their first snowstorm

In case you’re needing to see some sort of silver lining behind those snow clouds that socked the eastern seaboard and paralyzed the northeast this weekend, we offer this.

Kago and Kumbali — a dog and cheetah who have become best friends at the Metro Richmond Zoo — got to play in the snow for the first time during winter storm Jonas.

The zoo was closed Saturday, but a zookeeper let the popular duo run and play in the 7-inch deep snow in a large fenced field.

kumbaliKumbali was two weeks old when caretakers at the zoo noticed he was losing weight. The runt of a litter born to zoo cheetahs Khari (the mom) and Hatari (the dad), Kumbali was bottle fed and grew healthier, but having been removed from his litter he needed some companionship.

So the zoo got him a dog.

Kago, a 10-week old Lab mix, had been pulled from a high kill shelter in Alabama by The Art of Paws, an animal rescue group in Florida.

Zoo officials report the two have become inseparable.

Kumbali and Kago can be seen at the zoo Monday to Thursday from 12 to 1 p.m., and on Friday and Saturday from 12 to 1 p.m. and 3 to 4 p.m. And you can find their full story here.

Here’s a look at their first meeting, and their younger (snowless) days:

(Photos and videos courtesy of the Metro Richmond Zoo)

When dogs descend on Mayberry

Ace’s herniated disc — steadily improving, it seems — has slowed our wandering ways, leading us to limit out travels for at least another week. So far, during our stay in North Carolina, we’ve mostly stuck around the mansion grounds, taking it easy.

But that doesn’t mean we still can’t go to Mayberry, one way or another.

There are those who will tell you there is no real Mayberry in North Carolina. They’re the same ones who will tell you there is no Santa. In truth, in North Carolina, Mayberry is never more than 30 minutes away from wherever you are. You just head down that country road, away from the city, past the suburbs, and stop in the first town big enough to have gas pumps and a barber shop. If you’re greeted with a smile, and it appears genuine, you’re in Mayberry.

Of all the smallish towns in North Carolina, Mount Airy is the one that makes the most of its link to Mayberry, and — it being just up the road — we’ll be going there once Ace is up for it.

For now though, we get there via the couch, with a remote control as our steering wheel. Usually, if you keep flipping, you can find it and, for 30 minutes, go back to a time and place where gigabytes didn’t exist, the pace was slow, things were black and white, and life had just the right amount of complications — enough to keep it interesting, but not so many as to overwhelm your hard drive.

That’s what I liked about Mayberry: Every problem could, in less than 30 minutes, be resolved with some calm and unrushed reasoning — even what to do with a pesky pack of stray dogs.

PART ONE: In which Otis gets his breakfast and Opie finds a dog …

PART TWO: In which Barney takes the dogs — 11 of them now — to a happy place …

PART THREE: In which the strays save the day …

Polar Express: All hail breaks loose

 

With just two days left before Santa comes down the chiminea, even Arizona has decided it’s winter.

The last few days in Cave Creek — where I’m living in a (contradiction in terms alert) stationary motorhome — have been wet and cool, with temperatures plummeting at night to around, prepare yourself, 50 degrees.

We get by, and so far without turning on the heat. Instead I use three blankets and Ace. Normally, unless he’s feeling unusually needy, he’ll fall asleep with his head down by my feet and his rear pointed at my face, which is not without ramifications.

On the cold nights though, and there have been a couple, I reposition his 130 pounds so that we are side by side, pointed the same way, so that I might better absorb his warmth.

He puts up with it for a short time, then goes back to his old position.

Last night, as I reached out to give his head a final pat, only to get a handful of butt, we fell asleep to the pitter-patter — I’m pretty sure I heard both pitters and patters — of a gentle rain falling on the trailer roof, only to be awakened an hour or so later by tremendous pelting thuds of hail on the roof.

A hailstorm can be disconcerting in a real house, but in a trailer — without the attic or the insulation — it’s a lot more personal; every thud seems amplified, and a heavy hail sounds like machine gun fire.

Those whacks were enough to get Ace anxious, and when thunder and lightning rolled through he left the bed in search of a more secure hiding place.

It was as if one roof over his head wasn’t enough, and he was looking for a back-up one. He tried under the dinette table, but that was too cramped. He came back to the bedroom and crawled under the tiny ledge the TV sits on, then decided that wasn’t good enough, either.

He went to the front door, but I assured him that — given the falling hail, though I didn’t see it, sounded about golf ball size — wasn’t an advisable option.

So I invited him back on the bed, where he was more than happy to snuggle up as close as he could possibly get, pointed the same way as me, for the duration of the storm.

I threw my an Indian blanket over him, and he seemed to like that even better. I put my arm around him, and that is how we woke up this morning.

I’ve yet to go outside to check my car and my the chiminea for damage, but looking out my window as the sun comes up, the sky looks like maybe it will finally clear up today, and maybe our last few days in Arizona will bring us more sweet sunshine.

On Monday, maybe Tuesday, we’ll start the trip back east, totally unexcited about, and totally unprepared for, a taste of real winter.