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Tag: stray

Montana reservation conducting month-long “round-up” of stray dogs

Bison can roam free on the Fort Belknap Indian reservation in Montana.

Dogs aren’t so lucky.

The reservation’s Fish & Wildlife office began a “dog round-up” on July 25, capturing dogs that aren’t chained, kenneled or leashed and impounding them.

At least they say they are impounding them. Rescue organizations are actually bearing that responsibility, since the reservation doesn’t have an animal shelter.

RezQ Dogs, a non-profit shelter in Dodson, has brought in 19 dogs from the reservation and is attempting to find them new homes, according to its co-founder, Jim Wilke.

“Making the animals pay, killing the animals, it’s not the answer,” said Wilke. “Enforcing the laws, passing better laws is…whether it’s this community or anywhere in the United States, you’re not going to solve it by creating a cycle of death.”

Now at full capacity, Wilke says he’s turning to other rescue shelters and rescues across Montana, including in Kalispell, Helena, and Missoula, for help.

Tribal officials announced the round up last month and put up posters stating that any dog not chained or kenneled will be impounded immediately.

According to Wilke, the reservation has no shelter, and at least one tribal council member has said the dogs would be killed.

“To stand by and do nothing…it’s just sad,” said Wilke. “These animals. Death for no reason. Most of these animals have done nothing wrong but be born.”

Stray dogs are a problem on the reservation, and often band together in packs.

“When you have a bunch of stray animals, it doesn’t matter, they can be the nicest animals in the world, the entire mentality changes when they pack up. You can see it in all animals, even people,” said Wilke.

But, he says, the dogs he has taken in have been docile.

“They’re wonderful animals,” he told KRTV in Great Falls.”They’ll get good homes. You would think we got a lot of feral animals but everybody that’s met them, they’re just amazed by how nice they are.”

The dog round-up is scheduled to end on August 20.

After a 7-mile piggyback ride on a mountain bike, injured stray finds new home in Maine

It may have become the bicycle ride seen around the world — a stray and emaciated dog with a broken leg who was hoisted on the back of a mountain biker and rode seven miles, piggyback style, to safety.

But even before the images went viral, a happy ending was unfolding for the luckless dog, who now is living the good life on a farm in Maine.

Mountain biker Jarrett Little was with a group of fellow cyclists near Columbus, Georgia, when the dog limped out of the woods, appearing as if he had been hit by a car.

“He was really thin, ribs showing and had a lot of road rash and a broken leg,” Little told CBS News. They fed the dog, gave him water and, seeing no other choice, Little hoisted the dog on his back for the ride into town.

When they arrived in Columbus, he and the pup met a woman at a bike shop who took an interest in him. Andrea Shaw, who was in Columbus on a business trip, offered to take the dog home with her, and took him to a vet.

Columbo is now living on a horse ranch in Maine.

Shaw paid for surgery on the dog’s leg, and found an organization that could help get him back to Maine. She also chose his name, Columbo, in honor of the town where she met him.

Once Shaw got Columbo — nicknamed “Bo” for short — back to Maine, Shaw wrote a Facebook post, which included photos of Little hauling the dog on his back on his bicycle. When the photo went viral, she started a Facebook page called The Adventures of Columbo.

(Photos: Adventures of Columbo Facebook page)

Perfectly imperfect: Picasso the dog honored for showing what beauty really is

Picasso, the rescued dog with a twisted snout, was honored by the Oregon Humane Society for showing the world how perfect one with an imperfection can be.

At a ceremony In Portland last week, the 2-year-old pit bull-Chihuahua-Pomeranian mix received a Diamond Collar Hero Award.

The awards honor animals and people who have acted to save a human or animal life in peril, performed services within the community with undying loyalty, or overcome incredible odds in order to survive.

Picasso and his brother were picked up as strays in southern California. They were on the list to be euthanized when Liesl Wilhardt, the founder and executive director of Luvable Dog Rescue, pulled them out and brought them to Eugene last year.

She later decided to keep both as her own, unwilling to let them be separated because of Picasso’s devotion to his brother.

picasso11Picasso and Pablo quickly became part of her extended dog family, and Picasso became an Internet sensation as well — both for his story of survival and his unique appearance.

“Picasso has overcome challenges that most dogs don’t ever have to, from surviving an assaulter to living on the streets. And he’s done it all with courage and grace,” Wilhardt says. “Picasso’s personality and temperament is just loving and accepting to all living things, despite what he’s suffered in the past.”

Pablo died in October from a brain aneurysm, according to the Eugene Register-Guard. Picasso, unlike his brother, was born with his facial deformity.

Picasso is now in training to become a therapy dog, but he has already touched many lives

“He really does touch people, especially those who look a little different like him,” Wilhardt said. “Whether they were born different or had an illness or accident that led them to looking different, he’s helped and inspired so many people.”

Those offering him praise and thanks include soldiers with disfiguring wounds and children coming to terms with looking different.

Picasso also has been nominated for a 2018 American Humane Hero Dog Award, an annual nationwide competition that searches out and recognizes “America’s Hero Dogs.”

People can see the nominees and vote for an American Humane Hero Dog Award at herodogawards.org/vote.

Squish appears on Rachel Ray show

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Squish, an Ohio dog whose face was left twisted and contorted by what veterinarians believe was a severe beating, will be a guest on “The Rachel Ray Show” today.

Appearing via a video call with the once-abused dog will be the woman who rescued him and to whom he now belongs, a veterinary intern at the time who now practices in San Antonio.

Squish was a four-month-old stray when he ended up in the Cuyahoga County Animal Shelter in 2016, with a fractured jaw, fractured skull and missing one eye.

After two months, given his appearance made him unlikely to be adopted, and given he was barely able to eat, the shelter added him to the list of dogs to be euthanized, but sent him to VCA Great Lakes Veterinary Specialists for a second opinion.

squishdog2When intern Danielle Boyd was sent to carry him into the exam room, she was taken with his friendliness and trust. “I was enamored by this little one-eyed pup who clearly endured so much pain,” she told the dodo.

Boyd decided to bring him home that night, just to give him a break from the shelter.

He has been her’s ever since.

Even though she was just a week away from a scheduled to move to Texas to finish her veterinary residency, she adopted the dog and a series of extensive surgeries began.

Less than 36 hours after Squish’s surgery, they drove from Ohio to Texas. “That became the beginning of our many adventures together,” she says. Boyd had lost her dog just days before she met Squish.

After several surgeries, Squish — who had difficulty seeing out of his one eye and whose injuries prevented him from being able to eat — is chewing on tennis balls, munching dry dog food, and apparently carrying around sticks as crooked as his face.

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Vets suspect blunt force trauma led to his misshapen head. Both his skull and upper jaw had been fractured by a blow, or a series of them.

Squish now spends his time being the mascot for the veterinary hospital where Boyd works.

“Employees come visit him in my office when they need a little Squish love,” Boyd said. “Squish also shows clients whose pets are facing eye removal surgery how happy he is with one eye.”

Ray gave Boyd a lifetime supply of products from her Nutrish pet food line, and, along with everyone else in the studio audience, a $100 PetSmart gift cards.

(Top photo by Kin Man Hui /San Antonio Express-News, bottom photos by Danielle Boyd)

Nose-less dog found wandering the sreets in Kentucky is getting much-needed help

An animal clinic in Lexington, Ky., is working to heal a stray dog with a host of medical problems, including not having a nose.

The dog, believed to be a Jack Russell terrier mix, was taken in by the Pulaski County Animal Shelter after being seen walking down a road alone on a rainy and freezing night.

Woodstock Animal Foundation in Lexington agreed to take the dog and give her the care she needs, WKYT reported.

nonoseShe’s being called Mirabel, which means “of wondrous beauty.”

According to the clinic the dog is about eight years old. She was found dirty, cold and infested with fleas. Her missing nose is believed to be the result of a genetic defect.

According to a post on the Woodstock Animal Foundation Facebook page, a Pulaski County resident called the animal shelter in Pulaski County, which picked the dog up. Given all of the dog’s health problems, the shelter contacted the clinic.

“… She didn’t have a nose nor an upper lip and had had numerous litters of puppies,” the foundation said, and apparently she been bred frequently at a puppy mill.

Mirabel also has a heart murmur, an inguinal hernia, mammary tumors and needs a dental procedure.

She was updated on her vaccines, tested for heartworms and had her hernia repaired. The clinic is raising money for other necessary procedures.

The foundation says anyone interested in helping with those expenses can call them at 859-277-7729, or mail a check to the Woodstock Animal Foundation, at 843 Lane Allen Road Lexington, Ky., 40504. Contributions can also be made via PayPal to woodstockadoptions715@gmail.com.

Mirabel was treated to a trip this week to the PetValu store in Lexington’s Palomar center, where she received a bed, doggie treats, food, and a coat.

(Photo from the Facebook page of Woodstock Animal Foundation)

Dumped dog finds a home in city hall

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Rochester, Texas, is about three hours west of Fort Worth and about one hour north of Abilene — a small crossroads of a town (population, about 400) whose remote location has made it a common place for people to dump unwanted dogs.

How they fare after that varies, but one dog has made out OK, earning the unofficial title of “town dog,” spending summer days in the air conditioning of City Hall, and recently having moved into the home of the city manager.

“People are bad about dropping strays off here,” City Manager Gail Nunn told the Abilene Reporter-News. “We don’t know who left him, he was just dropped off as a puppy.”

He was originally spotted by resident Linda Short who gave him half her burrito and became a friend for life. Short had him neutered and vaccinated and he freely roamed the streets, often laying on the sidewalk outside the Hole In the Wall Café.

nuisance1Because he regularly seemed to patrol the street, she took to calling him Deputy Dog, but the name that stuck was Nuisance.

Not that the well-behaved dog is is too much of one.

In the summer, he spends much of his time inside City Hall, enjoying the air conditioning.

“During the day, he comes in and lays there,” Nunn said. “When he wants to get out and make his rounds, he’ll go to the door and tap on it for me let him out.”

Nuisance is a medium-sized, black and tan dog, and while he wasn’t causing too many complaints living on the streets, Nunn recently decided to take him home for his own safety.

For one thing, she didn’t want him to have the same fate of the previous town dog — Butter, a small yellow dog. “He got rattlesnake bit,” Nunn explained.

On top of that, stray dogs face other dangers, like coyotes, irate farmers, and speeding cars.

Nuisance is mostly adapting, but sometimes living up to his name by escaping.

Nunn said on a recent Sunday she drove her car to church — even though it’s right across the street — so the dog wouldn’t follow her.

Walking into the church, she looked down and saw Nuisance at her side.

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He’s still living up to the Deputy Dog moniker as well.

He was recently seen trailing a shady character, dressed in black with a pulled-up hoodie.

“They think it was somebody fixing to rob something,” Nunn said.

He also reacts when someone drives through town too fast or too loudly, perking up his ears and rising, as if readying himself for pursuit.

“It’s the ones that come through racing their motors,” Nunn said. “He goes after them.”

(Photos: City Manager Gail Nunn and Nuisance, by Ronald W. Erdrich / Reporter-News)

Will Bear come in from the wild?

After at least five years as a stray, avoiding human contact, surviving in a vacant field and regularly outsmarting animal control officers, a Texas dog named Bear may finally be heading for a home.

And good thing, because construction is expected to begin soon on the field he has called home, which is slated to become a housing development.

Bear is something of a legend in Hutto, a town of about 15,000 people, northeast of Austin. He’s a dog owned by no one, though many residents appreciate him from afar.

But in the past few years, one woman has gotten closer to him than most. Irma Mendoza and her son started bringing him food a couple of years ago, and also built him a dog house on the land.

Now, she is working to find him a home.

“It all started a couple of years ago when my mom found Bear by the block where we live,” said Alfonso Salinas, Irma’s son. ” …After that she just started to feed him and try to take care of him,” he told Fox 7 in Austin

Every day Irma comes to the field to give Bear food. She also gives him his annual medications.

“This dog is pretty much a family member,” Salinas said.

Bear has been seen roaming the neighborhood since 2010. Some think he was left behind when his owners moved.

Over the years, others in the community have pitched in to make sure Bear is taken care of.

“He is a survivor that’s for sure. He’s smart, he stays out of the way, stays out of the street, avoids people, and everybody has grown fond of him,” said Richard Rodriguez, who lives in the neighborhood. “He’s got his own Facebook page so that speaks something to how people like him.”

bearHutto Animal Control officer Wayne Cunningham — one of many who have tried to capture Bear — says Irma is the first person to get close to the dog.

“No one can get close to him but Irma so we haven’t been able to catch him. He’s gotten wise to our dog traps, he recognizes the animal control truck so he’s very leery about new people,” Cunningham said.

Mendoza is now working with Cunningham to help find Bear a permanent place to stay — with a friend who has spent years helping her care for him.

“He deserves to be in a loving home,” said Niroshini Glass. “He would be so spoiled. He would get anything and everything he wanted, when he wanted, how he wanted it. He would be very, very spoiled.”

All this hinges on Bear’s cooperation, of course, but with the progress that Irma has made, the willingness of Glass to provide a home, and the field destined to soon become a construction zone, the time appears ripe to take Bear out of the wild.

Once he is caught, he will be taken to the Williamson County Regional Animal Shelter to be evaluated before adoption.

A GoFundMe campaign has started to raise money to help pay Bear’s vet costs, and ongoing care.