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Tag: supplement

Cannabis oil treats might help your dog chill out during fireworks, storms, air travel

A Portland woman who launched a line of pet treats and supplements laced with a type of cannabis oil found what seemed the perfect place to market her products this week — a chain of fireworks stands in Oregon.

MaxDaddy treats contain CBD oil, a derivative of cannabis that company founder Carol Gardner says can help dogs with anxiety issues — including getting scared at the sound of loud fireworks.

CBD oil, which unlike THC, does not gets pets or people high, is believed by many to have relaxing properties.

md-home-nuggets-8oz-543x600MaxDaddy products include Bark Nuggets treats and Bark Dust, a powdered supplement that also contains CBD oil. The company is named after her English bulldog who suffers from anxiety.

“He’s the reason we actually started the company,” Gardner told KGW-TV in Portland. “It doesn’t zonk them out, it just makes them a lot calmer.”

Gardner said she hired two scientists and consulted with veterinarians when coming up with the product. CBD is a herbal supplement and therefore not regulated by the Food & Drug Administration.

How well it works to reduce anxiety in dogs, and whether it has ill effects, haven’t been fully studied.

But Gardner maintains the organic treats and dust can help dogs who panic during fireworks, thunderstorms and other high-stress events, like air travel or going to the groomer.

Gardner, 72, this week was selling MaxDaddy products, also available online, at all Mean Gene Fireworks Stands in Vancouver.

Selling fireworks-anxiety-reducing remedies at a fireworks stand makes a certain amount of sense — much like selling hangover treatments in a liquor store — and we won’t bother to state the obvious. (Namely, that skipping the culprit lessens the need for the remedy.)

According to the MaxDaddy website, MaxDaddy is a rescued English bulldog who has been with Gardner since he was five. He has suffered from joint pain due to arthritis, inflammation, anxiety and mobility issues.

Gardner was introduced to CBD, a natural product derived from agriculturally grown hemp plants, when she began looking for solutions for MaxDaddy’s health issues.

“All natural” dog sedative pulled off shelves

good-dogPetco  has pulled a “dog calming” medicine from its shelves after customers complained that, according to its ingredient label, it is 13 percent alcohol.

That’s about the same alcohol percentage as wine.

Made by Pet Organics, Good-Dog! is “for dogs that are unruly or hyper” and “helps to make your dog happy & content,” according to its label.

So would a nice merlot, but substantial amounts of alcohol aren’t recommended for dogs, and in large amounts it can by toxic.

More than 750 people signed a change.org petition for Petco to remove Good-Dog!, which claims to be made with “all natural ingredients.”

Petco spokesman initially said the product is safe, when used as directed — only a few drops should be added to the dogs water bowl.

“…This product has no negative effect on pets, and no known pet deaths or illnesses have been associated with this product in the 10 years it has been sold at Petco,” the spokesman said.

But after 7News in Denver reported the story, Petco announced that it has voluntarily recalled Good Dog Pet Calming Supplement, and issued the following statement:

“The health and safety of pets and people is Petco’s top priority. We sell a variety of calming remedies for pets with anxiety and also recommend that pet parents consult with their vet to ensure that there are no underlying health issues. In light of recent concerns expressed by some of our customers with regard to Good Dog Pet Calming Supplement, and this product’s alcohol content, we have decided to issue a voluntary recall, effective immediately…”

Dr. Narda Robinson, a veterinarian and physician at Colorado State University, said the case is indicative of a broader issue — a lack of regulation for homeopathic drugs for pets.

“If this product has a calming effect, it’s probably because of the alcohol, not because of the homeopathic medicine,” she said.

Dr. Tina Wismer, with the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center said many herbal medications have an alcohol base.

“They are supposed to be dosed at a couple of drops per animal. Certainly if they ingested the entire bottle and it was a small animal, they may become intoxicated,” she said.

Pro-Pet dog vitamins recalled

United Pet Group of Cincinnati is recalling all unexpired lots of its Pro-Pet Adult Daily vitamin supplement tablets for dogs because of possible salmonella contamination.

The Ohio company says it took the action “out of an abundance of caution” after one lot of the product tested positive for salmonella, according to Consumeraffairs.com.

The recalled vitamins — sold in retail stores nationwide — come in 100-count white plastic bottles with a light blue label and have a UPC of 26851-01800. All bottles with expiration dates on or before “06/13” are included in the recall.

Consumers with pets that consumed the recalled vitamins and have symptoms should contact their veterinarians.

United Pet Group said consumers should immediately stop giving their dogs the recalled vitamins. For more information about the recall, pet owners can contact the company at 1-800-645-5154, extension 3.