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Tag: team

“No comment” would have sufficed: TV reporter bitten while seeking interview


A woman who didn’t want to tell a TV news team “how she felt” about her daughter being shot threw a rock at them, shook a baseball bat at them, and then sent her dogs after reporter Abbey Niezgoda of ABC 6 News in Rhode Island.

The crew was on assignment in Providence, seeking to interview the mother of a teenage girl who was shot at a graduation party over the weekend.

Instead of politely declining to speak on-camera, Melissa Lawrence hurled a rock at ABC6 photographer Marc Jackson, then went inside for a baseball bat. Seconds later, she told her dogs to attack.

As Lawrence shouted commands, the dogs chased Niezgoda into a backyard a few houses away.

Niezgoda was a treated for a bite on her forearm.

Melissa Lawrence was charged with two counts of felony assault with a dangerous weapon.

Lawrence’s daughter, who was shot in the lower back, has since been released from the hospital.

Ruby reassembled

Ruby the lurcher

A team of 40 vets and nurses, working around the clock for over two months, helped reassemble a three-year-old dog named Ruby after she was hit by a car.

After  a series of operations at a cost of £11,500, Ruby, who remained cheerful and upbeat throughout the ordeal, is recovering, according to the Daily Mail.

Ruby suffered fractures to her two front legs, sternum and toe, a dislocated knee, ruptured ligaments and internal bleeding when she was struck by the car on January 26.

Because she did not have any head injuries, the vets said if she could live through the next 24 hours she had a good chance.

“Her legs will take about five months to heal totally but in herself she is happy, sweet-natured and an inspiration to the rest of us,” said her owner, Vanessa Gillespie. ”The vet said he had never seen a dog so broken still so happy. Most dogs would not have survived but Ruby is a toughie.’

Ruby was run over in the village of Cambourne in Cambridgeshire.

Rubys Injuries.jpg

She spent five weeks at Queen’s Veterinary School Hospital in Cambridge, and had two major operations — first a nine-hour procedure in which her broken legs were repaired using four metal plates and screws, then a seven-hour operation to replace the ruptured knee ligaments, carry out skin grafts and amputate the broken toe. The fractured breastbone and internal bleeding were left to heal naturally.

Gillespie said most of the bill was covered by insurance. “If she had not been insured we would have had to put her down,” she said.

Bonnie & Clyde: A blind dog’s guide dog

bonnieandclydeWhen two stray border collies were taken in by Meadow Green Dog Rescue in England, operators of the shelter gave them names befitting a team — Bonnie and Clyde.

Then they found out just how special a team they are: Clyde, it turns out, is blind, and Bonnie is his unofficial guide dog.

The rescue has no idea where the duo came from, but reports that Bonnie stays  inches from Clyde’s side while guiding him on walks, or to food or water, and lets him rest his head on her haunches whenever he becomes disoriented.

When they are together, Clyde, estimated to be five years old, seems nearly as capable as any dog. But when Bonnie, believed to be two years old, is not at his side, Clyde refuses to move.

The inseparable pair were rescued as strays three weeks ago — found abandoned on a street in the middle of a storm, the Telegraph reported.

Meadow Green Dog Rescue in Loddon, Norfolk,  is trying to find them a new home, but officials there are insisting they be adopted as a team.

“If Clyde’s unsure where he is he will suddenly go behind her and put his face on her back so she can guide him where he is going,” said Cherie Cootes. “He totally relies on her the whole time. When she walks she tends to stop and make sure he’s there – she does look out for him.

“There’s absolutely no option of homing them separately – they have to go as a pair,” she added.

A citizen spotted the two dogs running through the rain in Blundeston, Norfolk. When she opened her car door they jumped right in. The dogs have no identification on their collars, and are not microchipped.

Cherie described the dogs as “typical high-spirited collies” and said they would make ideal pets in a home with a large, secure yard away from busy roads.

Sue Cootes, 59, who runs the rescue center with her daughter Cherie, said it was amazing to watch Bonnie assist Clyde.

 ”It’s just instinctive with them to help each other and it’s marvelous to see animals doing this together,” she said. “Without Bonnie, Clyde would be lost. They can’t be separated, we need someone to take them both on.”

Missing Iditarod dog shows up after 3 days

Nigel, the Iditarod dog who left his team and took off into the Alaska wilderness after his musher’s sled was disabled, showed up Friday.

The husky became separated from first-time competitor Nancy Yoshida on Tuesday.

While searchers had spotted Nigel from the air and were following his movements, Nigel arrived on his own at the Talvista Lodge near Skwentna, the Minneapolis Star-Tribune reported.

Iditarod spokesman Chas St. George said Yoshida cried upon being reunited with her dog. “You could tell the two of them missed each other a lot,” he said.

Nigel was well-hydrated and was in very good condition, considering he’d been roughing it for three days. “Nancy fed him right away out there, and he’s continued to eat,” St. George said. “He’s doing fine.”

Yoshida, 58, of North Dakota, said the husky “was pretty shook up” after she crashed while trying to negotiate a difficult stretch of the route, about 200 miles into the race.

Dog goes missing on Iditarod Trail

Race officials yesterday vowed to continue the search for a dog missing in the Iditarod.

Nancy Yoshida, 58, of North Dakota, who was entered in her first Iditarod sled dog race, was forced to drop out of the 1,100-mile race around midday Tuesday after her sled lost its runners. In the process, one of her dogs got loose and is lost in the winter wilderness, the Minneapolis Star-Tribune reports.

After becoming stalled amid sharp switchbacks and losing both runners on her sled, one of the dogs on Yoshida’s team became separated from the team of 16 and ran off, race spokesman Chas St. George said today.

Searchers in the area, which is within the first quarter of the course, had been looking for the dog since daybreak, St. George said. Yoshida, who “spent a long time looking for her dog” on Tuesday, remains at the nearby Rainy Pass checkpoint.

“We’ve had great success” finding lost dogs in the past, St. George said. While the searchers “would never put their lives in jeopardy … we’re going to continue to search until we find this dog.”

Meanwhile, a necropsy on a dog that died in the race found no obvious cause of death, according to Iditarod race marshall Mark Nordman. Further tests were planned, according to the Anchorage Daily News.

The 6-year-old male, named Victor, was in the team of Jeff Holt from North Pole. When the dog faltered, Holt tried to revive him, then carried him in the sled to the Rohn checkpoint, where veterinarians pronounced the dog dead.

City seeks animal emergency volunteers

     One of the lessons learned from Hurricane Katrina — pretty much the same lesson the police officer in San Marcos, Texas learned — is that, no, it’s not just a dog.
    People will go to great lengths to save their pets, or even refuse to leave them behind in a disaster. And the public sentiment is clearly that pets deserve to be rescued as much as we do.
    In response to the demand for emergency preparedness plans for animals in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, the National Disaster Animal Response Team was created, and states, counties and now cities have begun creating their own disaster response teams.

    The city of Baltimore is looking for volunteers to assist in forming a team that will rescue and care for animals during disasters and emergencies.

    At the state level, the teams are knowns as State Animal Response Teams or SARTs. At the city level, the teams will be knowns as CART (for City Animal Response Teams). Volunteers will be trained in animal emergency preparedness and response, according to the Baltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter (BARCS), which issued the call for volunteers. 

    For information about SART and CART, go to www.sartusa.org. For information about how you can get involved with the Baltimore CART volunteer group, contact Alexis Mitchell at alexisrizz@gmail.com

(Photo: Cover of “Pawprints of Katrina,” by Cathy Scott, Wiley Publishing, Inc.)

Finally, the standard output.
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