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Tag: team

What the Raven did to the gator and the dog

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Once there was a Raven, an alligator and a dog, and the latter two were allegedly abused and neglected by the former.

Apparently that’s all the information officials think we’re entitled to as the curious case of Terrence Cody continues not to unfold.

Even with news of his indictment — the former Baltimore Raven faces 15 charges — what is alleged to have transpired in the Baltimore County home of Cody isn’t being shared with the public.

The charges include two counts of aggravated animal cruelty with a dog, five counts of animal abuse or neglect with the same dog, five counts of abuse or neglect in connection with alligator, and one count of illegal possession of an alligator, according to Deputy State’s Attorney John Cox.

But what exactly Cody is accused of doing, or neglecting to do, in connection with both animals is being left to our imaginations.

That, especially given he was in the NFL, leaves us free to picture the worst — as in staging fights between the two species, as in maybe the alligator went unfed until it tried to eat the dog, as in maybe Cody used them both to attack a girlfriend on an elevator, as in who knows what.

That’s a disservice, to the public and to Cody.

“Ban Terrence Cody From the NFL for Allegedly Feeding His Dog to His Pet Alligator!” says a headline on the website Care2. Clicking on a link to a petition, though, readers are informed  ”Terrence Cody did not feed his dog to his alligator as the author of the petition has falsely indicated. New info reveals that his dog passed away as a result of worms, after being severely neglected by the ex-Ravens player.”

When there is an information void, our imaginations, and sometimes our websites, are only to happy to fill it.

Once an indictment is revealed, some details should be released by authorities that go beyond “he did something illegal to this animal and to that animal.”

Imagine if law enforcement and prosecutors had taken that no-details approach in the Michael Vick case. Imagine if they had said, “We seized all these dogs because something bad was going on, but we’re not going to say what until the story unravels in court — if it even goes to court.

News that Cody, 26, was being investigated for animal cruelty came out the same day the Ravens announced he was being released from the team.

The Ravens didn’t go into the allegations, and coach John Harbaugh, in announcing Cody’s termination, said only that the “threshold of tolerance” had changed in the NFL. “It’s a privilege to play in the National Football League. It’s a privilege to be a part of the Ravens. There’s a standard to uphold there, and we expect them to.”

Cody was officially released from the team Monday — the same day the indictment came out.

The indictment says the felony aggravated animal cruelty charges (they carry a maximum three-year sentence) stem from the death of his Presa Canario.

Through the indictment, the public learned there was an alligator involved as well — though not necessarily in connection with the dog’s death. In addition to five counts of abuse or neglect of the alligator, Cody was also charged with one count of possession with intent to use drug paraphernalia and one count of possession of marijuana.

The investigation was started after Cody took his dog to a veterinarian.

Peter Schaffer, Cody’s agent, told the Baltimore Sun that Cody took the dog to a vet for treatment of worms, and that the dog died there. He didn’t share any additional details, either.

“This is all a result of the NFL allowing players to be convicted before they’re tried,” Schaffer said. “If Terrence wasn’t a public figure, they wouldn’t have ever charged him. It’s just ridiculous.”

Cody, having played in only one game last season, wasn’t too major a public figure, and maybe that’s why law enforcement and prosecutors think they can get away with providing virtually no information about what transpired.

He was a nose tackle, not a quarterback, and possibly authorities thought the case could pass quietly under the radar.

The alligator twist probably kept that from happening.

Other than informing us that Cody turned himself in and was released on $10,000 bail, and dutifully reporting the few details officials have released, there hasn’t been much digging, it seems, by the news media.

The NFL has said it would look into the case only if Cody signs with another team, according to a Baltimore Sun report.

Manwhile, the news media, and the animal welfare community, should be demanding some details.

One, because we have a right to know. Two, because animal cruelty cases shouldn’t be swept under rugs. It is through exposure that problems can be addressed and changes can occur.

What, exactly, is Terrence Cody alleged to have done? Why, exactly, aren’t law and order types letting us know? And, while the dog died, and while Cody will be a Raven nevermore, what has become of the alligator?

Ecuadorian stray becomes global celebrity after bonding with adventure racing team

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That Ecuadorian street dog who befriended a Swedish adventure racing team after they tossed him a meatball is an official resident of Sweden now.

Arthur, as the team named him, followed the extreme racers for the last 50 or so miles of the 430-mile race — slogging through mud, traipsing through jungle growth, climbing up mountainsides and at one point, after race officials advised the team to leave the dog behind, plunging into a river and swimming alongside their kayaks.

The team had stopped to eat before the final two stages of the race when member Mikael Lindnord noticed the scruffy yellow stray and tossed him a meatball from the can he was eating from.

It was a simple, nonchalant gesture — one Lindnord said he didn’t think too much of at the time.

Clearly, though, Arthur did.

When the four-member team finished lunch and resumed the race — beginning a 24-mile hike through the rainforest — Arthur, named after the legendary King Arthur, got up and followed.

Adventure Racing is a form of extreme sport that combines continuous hiking, trekking, mountain biking and kayaking.

At a checkpoint before the final segment of the race — a 36-mile stretch of river — race organizers warned the team that taking Arthur along was inadvisable and posed a risk to both the dog’s safety and their’s.

Team members agreed to push on without him, but after their kayaks pulled away Arthur jumped into the river, caught up with them and swam alongside.

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When Lindnord saw the dog was struggling to keep up, he pulled Arthur aboard.

Spectators standing on shore applauded.

By the end of the race, Lindnord said he had decided to try and adopt the dog and take him back to Sweden.

He admitted in a Daily Mail article that Arthur — due to living a harsh life on the streets — was in pretty bad shape even before accompanying the team on the last two legs of the race.

Once the race was over, Arthur was taken to a vet in Ecuador, and Lindnor applied to Sweden’s board of agriculture, or Jordbruksverket for permission to bring Arthur home. Arthur had already become a media star by then.

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“I almost cried in front of the computer, when receiving the decision from in Sweden,” Lindnord wrote on the Facebook page of Team Peak Performance.

They flew home together this week.

“I came to Ecuador to win the World Championship,” he said. “Instead, I got a new friend.”

(Photos: Krister Göransson)

“No comment” would have sufficed: TV reporter bitten while seeking interview


A woman who didn’t want to tell a TV news team “how she felt” about her daughter being shot threw a rock at them, shook a baseball bat at them, and then sent her dogs after reporter Abbey Niezgoda of ABC 6 News in Rhode Island.

The crew was on assignment in Providence, seeking to interview the mother of a teenage girl who was shot at a graduation party over the weekend.

Instead of politely declining to speak on-camera, Melissa Lawrence hurled a rock at ABC6 photographer Marc Jackson, then went inside for a baseball bat. Seconds later, she told her dogs to attack.

As Lawrence shouted commands, the dogs chased Niezgoda into a backyard a few houses away.

Niezgoda was a treated for a bite on her forearm.

Melissa Lawrence was charged with two counts of felony assault with a dangerous weapon.

Lawrence’s daughter, who was shot in the lower back, has since been released from the hospital.

Ruby reassembled

Ruby the lurcher

A team of 40 vets and nurses, working around the clock for over two months, helped reassemble a three-year-old dog named Ruby after she was hit by a car.

After  a series of operations at a cost of £11,500, Ruby, who remained cheerful and upbeat throughout the ordeal, is recovering, according to the Daily Mail.

Ruby suffered fractures to her two front legs, sternum and toe, a dislocated knee, ruptured ligaments and internal bleeding when she was struck by the car on January 26.

Because she did not have any head injuries, the vets said if she could live through the next 24 hours she had a good chance.

“Her legs will take about five months to heal totally but in herself she is happy, sweet-natured and an inspiration to the rest of us,” said her owner, Vanessa Gillespie. ”The vet said he had never seen a dog so broken still so happy. Most dogs would not have survived but Ruby is a toughie.’

Ruby was run over in the village of Cambourne in Cambridgeshire.

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She spent five weeks at Queen’s Veterinary School Hospital in Cambridge, and had two major operations — first a nine-hour procedure in which her broken legs were repaired using four metal plates and screws, then a seven-hour operation to replace the ruptured knee ligaments, carry out skin grafts and amputate the broken toe. The fractured breastbone and internal bleeding were left to heal naturally.

Gillespie said most of the bill was covered by insurance. “If she had not been insured we would have had to put her down,” she said.

Bonnie & Clyde: A blind dog’s guide dog

bonnieandclydeWhen two stray border collies were taken in by Meadow Green Dog Rescue in England, operators of the shelter gave them names befitting a team — Bonnie and Clyde.

Then they found out just how special a team they are: Clyde, it turns out, is blind, and Bonnie is his unofficial guide dog.

The rescue has no idea where the duo came from, but reports that Bonnie stays  inches from Clyde’s side while guiding him on walks, or to food or water, and lets him rest his head on her haunches whenever he becomes disoriented.

When they are together, Clyde, estimated to be five years old, seems nearly as capable as any dog. But when Bonnie, believed to be two years old, is not at his side, Clyde refuses to move.

The inseparable pair were rescued as strays three weeks ago — found abandoned on a street in the middle of a storm, the Telegraph reported.

Meadow Green Dog Rescue in Loddon, Norfolk,  is trying to find them a new home, but officials there are insisting they be adopted as a team.

“If Clyde’s unsure where he is he will suddenly go behind her and put his face on her back so she can guide him where he is going,” said Cherie Cootes. “He totally relies on her the whole time. When she walks she tends to stop and make sure he’s there – she does look out for him.

“There’s absolutely no option of homing them separately – they have to go as a pair,” she added.

A citizen spotted the two dogs running through the rain in Blundeston, Norfolk. When she opened her car door they jumped right in. The dogs have no identification on their collars, and are not microchipped.

Cherie described the dogs as “typical high-spirited collies” and said they would make ideal pets in a home with a large, secure yard away from busy roads.

Sue Cootes, 59, who runs the rescue center with her daughter Cherie, said it was amazing to watch Bonnie assist Clyde.

 ”It’s just instinctive with them to help each other and it’s marvelous to see animals doing this together,” she said. “Without Bonnie, Clyde would be lost. They can’t be separated, we need someone to take them both on.”

Missing Iditarod dog shows up after 3 days

Nigel, the Iditarod dog who left his team and took off into the Alaska wilderness after his musher’s sled was disabled, showed up Friday.

The husky became separated from first-time competitor Nancy Yoshida on Tuesday.

While searchers had spotted Nigel from the air and were following his movements, Nigel arrived on his own at the Talvista Lodge near Skwentna, the Minneapolis Star-Tribune reported.

Iditarod spokesman Chas St. George said Yoshida cried upon being reunited with her dog. “You could tell the two of them missed each other a lot,” he said.

Nigel was well-hydrated and was in very good condition, considering he’d been roughing it for three days. “Nancy fed him right away out there, and he’s continued to eat,” St. George said. “He’s doing fine.”

Yoshida, 58, of North Dakota, said the husky “was pretty shook up” after she crashed while trying to negotiate a difficult stretch of the route, about 200 miles into the race.

Dog goes missing on Iditarod Trail

Race officials yesterday vowed to continue the search for a dog missing in the Iditarod.

Nancy Yoshida, 58, of North Dakota, who was entered in her first Iditarod sled dog race, was forced to drop out of the 1,100-mile race around midday Tuesday after her sled lost its runners. In the process, one of her dogs got loose and is lost in the winter wilderness, the Minneapolis Star-Tribune reports.

After becoming stalled amid sharp switchbacks and losing both runners on her sled, one of the dogs on Yoshida’s team became separated from the team of 16 and ran off, race spokesman Chas St. George said today.

Searchers in the area, which is within the first quarter of the course, had been looking for the dog since daybreak, St. George said. Yoshida, who “spent a long time looking for her dog” on Tuesday, remains at the nearby Rainy Pass checkpoint.

“We’ve had great success” finding lost dogs in the past, St. George said. While the searchers “would never put their lives in jeopardy … we’re going to continue to search until we find this dog.”

Meanwhile, a necropsy on a dog that died in the race found no obvious cause of death, according to Iditarod race marshall Mark Nordman. Further tests were planned, according to the Anchorage Daily News.

The 6-year-old male, named Victor, was in the team of Jeff Holt from North Pole. When the dog faltered, Holt tried to revive him, then carried him in the sled to the Rohn checkpoint, where veterinarians pronounced the dog dead.

Finally, the standard output.
my sources