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Tag: twitter

Dog’s ear cyst resembles Donald Trump

trumpear

I’ve written before about that distinctively human tendency to see images in inanimate objects — everything from Jesus on a grilled cheese sandwich to a dog in a piece of wood.

My theory on that whole phenomenon is that we see, with only the slightest hint or suggestion, what our subconscious wants us to see, such as Abraham Lincoln in a chicken nugget; or what it fears seeing, such as Satan in a storm cloud.

But Donald Trump in a dog’s ear? I won’t attempt to explain that.

BBC reported that Jade Robinson, 25, of Jarrow, Tyneside, was photographing her beagle’s infected ear when a friend spotted the 45th president’s face in the dog’s cyst.

chiefThe dog’s name? Chief.

Robinson said she was taking the picture to pass along to her vet. Chief would have to be sedated for the vet to properly examine the ear — and she was short of the funds necessary to do that.

Amazingly enough, her photo going viral led her to launch a crowdfunding campaign, which has already raised 80 percent of its £450 goal.

Hail to the chief!

On the justgiving.com website, Robinson warns that goal amount will likely increase depending on what treatments the vet prescribes — up to and including removing the president from Chief’s ear.

Robinson said she has always made it a point to keep Chief’s ears clean, but beagles are notorious for picking up dirt, which, as we all know, can lead to infections.

“If you know anything about beagles you know how intelligent, active and curious they are and Chief certainly lives up to that – he’s full of mischief.

“As he has the very distinctive long ears, they spend a lot of time scraping the ground sniffing for lovely smells; unfortunately this leads to his ears picking up a lot of dirt.”

Robinson said she never saw Trump when she was taking the photo.

“…It was my eagle-eyed friend who pointed it out.”

Readers: Please note how I, despite my political leanings, presented that whole story without implying the current president is in any way a cyst in need of removal. Nor did I comment on how awful it would be to have Donald Trump constantly in one’s ear — mainly because, between his tweets and the news media, we already know that.

In badmouthing his human foes, Trump manages to also offend dogs everywhere

misspWhile the hotels that carry his name may be dog-friendly, President Trump is definitely not — as shown not just by his refusal to have one in the White House, but in his word choice.

Examine his insults, his verbal slaps, his testy tweets and you will find unkind references to dogs in many of them.

Newsweek did just that and concluded:

“Not only is President Donald Trump the first White House resident in generations to not have a first pooch, but the very word ‘dog’ is the root of so many of the Tweeter in Chief’s favorite insults.”

Of one of his newest rivals, Republican Sen. Bob Corker, the president recently said, “Couldn’t get elected dog catcher.”

He used the exact same term to describe former New York Governor George Pataki, former New Hampshire Governor John Sununu in 2015, South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham, Michael Bloomberg and Hillary Clinton.

He said he watched Marco Rubio “sweating like a dog” during his campaign.

He called former Obama administration adviser David Axelrod a dog after he criticized him on Fox News.

Among those he has said were “fired like a dog” were NBC’s David Gregory, Glenn Beck and Ted Cruz’s communications director.

Former Acting Attorney General Sally Yates and former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper both choked “like dogs” in Senate testimony in May, he told Time.

Mitt Romney, in his campaign for president, “choked like a dog,” too, in Trump’s view.

William McKinley is the last president to not have a dog, though he had other pets.

Generally, the only photos of Trump with dogs are from when he regularly invited the the winner of the Westminster Dog Show to visit his palatial Trump Tower suite, as is the case with the photo at the top of this post.

At least one citizen graciously offered him a dog, but he, quite ungraciously, snubbed the offer. By the time he informed heiress Lois Pope he didn’t want the dog, she’d already fallen in love and decided to keep it.

Further evidence of Trump’s distaste for the species — at least non-pedigreed members — can be found in a memoir, “Raising Trump,” written by his ex-wife Ivana.

“Donald was not a dog fan,” she wrote. When Ivana brought home a poodle named Chappy, to Trump’s displeasure, she said she gave him this choice — “It’s me and Chappy or no one!”

He gave in, but never showed much fondness for the poodle — and the feeling was mutual, she wrote.

In point of fact, dogs don’t sweat. In point of fact, dogs don’t lie. In point of fact, dog catcher is not an elected position — at least not in modern times. Yet he uses references to dogs, repeatedly and erroneously, as a metaphor/simile for lowly behavior, or to describe anyone he doesn’t like.

News flash, Mr. President, (of the non-fake variety): Dogs are probably held in higher regard in America than either you or the presidency.

I did not want to see Trump elected anything, least of all president. And I don’t think he’d make a good “dog catcher,” either. As experienced as he is at shoveling the you-know-what, he’d probably be good at cleaning out kennels.

But hey, he — unfortunately — has a country to run.

Bill O’Reilly’s dog will never take a knee

DHYRcn_XYAAJzJ1You wouldn’t expect a “leg man” to own a breed of dog that barely has any.

But that is the case — ousted Fox News loudmouth, bestselling historian and accused sexual harrasser Bill O’Reilly is the proud owner of a Corgi, who he has been spending a lot more time with since leaving his job, and featuring regularly of late on his Instagram account.

Holly is her name, and he’s posted photos of her 11 times since August, according to AVclub.com.

O’Reilly these days is keeping busy producing a self-broadcasted (and we’d guess self-important) vlog, through which he continues to offer his conservative opinions on matters of politics and more.

O’Reilly, who also tweets, recently posted this photo of Holly, pointing out that she would never take a knee during the National Anthem — “even if she had knees.”

holly2

Not willing to let him get away with such a blatant distortion of fact, AVClub points out, for the record, that corgis do have knees.

Fox News let O’Reilly go in April amid mounting allegations against him of sexual harrassment. Between him and Fox, $13 million in settlements were paid to five women who made such claims against him, according to the New York Times.

Even more accusers surfaced after that, and advertisers began withdrawing, leading Fox to send him home to spend more time with his dog.

Watching this eclipse won’t melt your eyes — only your heart

For those of you who missed the Great American Eclipse — aka the day the moon photobombed the sun — here, via Twitter, is a highly scientific reenactment, staged by two pug puppies and their owner(s).

Trump-defending news analyst now doing his own damage control — thanks to a dog

tweet

Mark Halperin, a senior NBC political analyst known as a frequent defender of President Trump, has suffered his own Twitter-related embarrassment — and is taking some hits for the disrespect he seemed to show a therapy dog on a cross-country Delta flight

It all stems from a in-air tweet Halperin posted after finding himself seated next to a bow-tie wearing support dog named Charlie. Halperin posted a photo of the dog with the caption, “Seriously, @delta??!?”

Some took that to mean he was taking umbrage to his seating companion, and dog lovers — as is their way — commenced to deem him an apparent snob, asshole, douchebag or worse.

Halperin then — sincerely or not — went into damage control mode.

He tweeted that the main purpose of the original tweet was to show a photo of a cute dog:

“This dog is cute & service, companion & emotional support dogs=best souls on Earth.Point was,on long flt Delta sat dog apart from its owner.”

He elaborated the people were reacting incorrectly to his original tweet, and that he was trying to do too much good at once — delighting followers with photos of a cute dog while pointing out a flaw in Delta’s procedures for not seating Charlie with his owner, a Delta employee who was seated across the aisle.

He said he offered to switch seats with the owner but that doing so was prohibited by “LAX traffic, TSA, redeye logistics & overhead bin issues.”

Then that pesky second side of the story came out.

The dog’s owner says Halperin made no such offer to switch seats.

Anthony Pisano, a Delta flight attendant who paid full fare for both his and Charlie’s seats, gave this account of what happened in first class.

“I had purchased 6A and 6B and Halperin was in 6C. The dog and I fly back and forth from California to NY 2–3 times a month. I am always aware to make sure to get the dog her own seat (she lays on the floor and sleeps) to ensure she doesn’t encroach anyone’s personal space. So I put Charlie (the dog) in 6A where she was great. She was in arms reach and everything was cool. Right before we took off the dog came and sat in between my legs for take off so she was secured. At this point halperin (I had no idea who he was) calls for a flight attendant and tells her that he refuses to sit next to a dog.

“Those were his exact words. At that point I noticed he took a picture of the dog which I just ignored. Next thing you know the lead flight attendant asked if I minded giving halperin 6A. It was so strange he wouldn’t even look or speak to me about it. If he would have asked me I would have obliged, no big deal. I couldn’t believe how rude this guy was carrying on as I sat right next to him. So I obliged, he moved into 6A and left his shoes and a mess in his little first class cubicle area. I politely brought him his shoes and belongings to which he literally looked the other way and that was that.”

(Except for a parting tweet on Pisano’s Twitter page:)

charlie

Apparently, Halperin (some call him a Trump lap dog) got the separation he desired from Charlie, the emotional support dog.

As for which version is the most accurate, I can’t say, but I will rank the believability of the subjects involved:

1. Charlie the dog
2. The flight attendant
3. The political pundit

(Photos: At top, Charlie, as pictured in Halperin’s tweet; lower, Charlie, in a parting tweet on Pisano’s Twitter page)

Folks lining up to bring home this Picasso

picasso1

Like the subjects of his namesake’s paintings, Picasso the dog has a face that seems to exist on separate planes.

The lower half of his snout lines up just perfectly under his hopeful brown eyes, but the upper half, due to a facial deformity, veers drastically to the right, making his drooping nose look like it’s about to slide off.

picassoandpabloFour of his siblings were sold, but Picasso and a brother (since named Pablo) ended up at the Porterville Animal Shelter in California.

Picasso, due to his lopsided appearance, was put on the euthanize list.

Last month, an Oregon rescue group pulled Picasso and Pablo from the shelter in hopes of finding them homes.

And not long after the first photo of Picasso hit the Internet, he became a celebrity of viral proportions.

“They’re really nice dogs — not just adorable, but wonderful dogs,” Liesl Wilhardt, executive director of Luvable Dog Rescue in Eugene, told TODAY.

picasso2Since their Feb. 11 arrival, Picasso and his brother, 10-month-old pit bull-terrier mixes, have become the stars of the rescue’s social media feeds — and hundreds of people have inquired about adopting them in the last few days.

The rescue is insisting that, because of their bond, they be adopted as a pair.

For now, the brothers are staying with several other dogs in a communal living-style cabin operated by Luvable Dog Rescue.

The rescue says that, while they’re accepting applications, they’re still working to address Picasso’s medical needs, including removing a tooth that’s digging into gums.

That’s not going to alter his unusual appearance, but judging from the response his lopsided mug has received, that’s not going to matter.

(Photos: Luvabledogrescue.org)

Why is it always Jesus and dogs we think we see in toast, wood, grilled cheese, etc.?

doginwood

A recent photo posted to Twitter — of a dog’s image in a piece of wood — gets me to thinking: Why is almost always Jesus (or sometimes his mom) and dogs (or sometimes other animals) that show up in inanimate objects, i.e. inside wood, on grilled cheeses, in potato chips, Cheetos, peirogies, tortillas or cinnamon buns?

lincolnnuggetThe answer’s pretty easy: We tend to see what we want to see; we tend to see the things we love most.

There are exceptions to the Jesus and dogs rule — potatoes that look like George Washington, chicken nuggets that resemble Abraham Lincoln — but even then it’s commonly what we cherish most (such as beloved presidents) that we think we see.

Chris Blundell recently posted the image at the top of this post on his Twitter page.

There, it was quickly joined by more reader submitted photos of dogs in wood:

moredogsinwood

moredogwoodThat dogs are giving Jesus a run for his money — in terms of making appearances in wood, at least — says something about how the species has become ever more ingrained in our hearts.

I won’t sink to pointing out what dog spelled backwards is, but I’ll say this:

If Jesus showed up on my grilled cheese, I’d eat it anyway. If there was a dog visible in my wood paneling, on the other hand, I wouldn’t paint over it.

With the rise of social media, we’re seeing much more of this type of thing.

But it has always gone on — so much so that there are names for it.

Pareidolia is seeing (or hearing) something significant in a random image or sound. The word is derived from the Greek words para, meaning something faulty, and the noun eidōlon, meaning image, form or shape.

Sightings of spiritual or religious images in objects are called simulacra.

ebay-virgin-mary-grilled-cheese-getty-128167414Those are the most famous, and the most often reported — the faces and or bodies of Jesus or the Virgin Mary having been perceived, by both believers and non-believers, in toast, frying pans, grilled cheese sandwiches, the facade of buildings, firewood, rocks, tortillas, cinnamon buns, pretzels and more.

By the way, that grilled cheese Virgin Mary, seen directly above (some people thought the image more closely resembled Bernadette Peters) went on to sell on eBay in 2004 for $28,000.

jesusordogJesus, too, has been seen in grilled cheese sandwiches, including this one — though when I look at it, I see a dog. (Then again, I’m the guy who spent countless hours during my year-long road trip with Ace, looking for the image of dogs in kudzu.)

It’s really nothing to be ashamed of, this spotting of things within other things. To the contrary, I think those who spot them, while they might not be blessed with eternal life, are blessed with an active imagination. They are able to look at clouds and see something else entirely.

Leonardo da Vinci wrote about pareidolia, saying this: “If you look at any walls spotted with various stains or with a mixture of different kinds of stones, if you are about to invent some scene you will be able to see in it a resemblance to various different landscapes adorned with mountains, rivers, rocks, trees, plains, wide valleys, and various groups of hills.”

Georgia O’Keefe used it in her paintings of flowers, embedding hidden images that more often than not left us feeling guilty for having dirty minds.

Psychologists used it with their Rorschach tests, which had us interpret random inkblots that more often than not left us feeling guilty for having dirty minds.

Then again, we tend to see in random objects the things we long for, the things that make us happy.

There are exceptions to that as well. Some hated and feared faces have been spotted in objects over the years — with Satan being the most common.

But far more often we see something that soothes us, like dogs, something that gives us hope, like dogs, something that makes us smile, like dogs.

So, if you’re seeing things within things, don’t rush to a shrink. Don’t join a pareidolia support group. Instead, celebrate and savor your pareidolia — whether it be through pieces of wood, your morning toast or with those fluffy white clouds dancing like … you name it … across a deep blue sky.

(Photos: Twitter, Wikipedia, Imgur)