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Tag: video game

Fireworks silenced after complaints they were too loud — in a video game

A temporary Independence Day fireworks celebration in the online game Watch Dogs 2 was silenced on July 4 due to concerns that they were too loud.

At least one player said they were scaring their dog.

The fireworks had been added to the game as part of a temporary update that was scheduled to stay in effect from June 29 through July 10.

But the bangs were turned off on July 4 after the company caved in to complaints that they were annoying.

Too bad we can’t do that in real life.

This story — reported in Kotaku.com — has several layers of absurdity. We’ll just point out a few of them.

First, as you might be asking yourself, if the game noises are so bothersome, why don’t players just mute their devices?

Or why don’t they just not play, as in turning off the whole game? The answer to that one is probably that they are so hopelessly addicted to it that the idea doesn’t even occur to them.

Beyond that, though, there’s something weird about people launching a campaign to silence the turn-off-able fireworks in a virtual game when, in real life, there has never been much of a sustained effort to silence the non turn-off-able ones.

Could it be that some of us have become more concerned about the quality of their virtual lives than the quality of their real ones?

In any event, the protesting gamers took to Twitter, where they described the sounds of the fireworks as “completely obnoxious,” “f—ing annoying” and scary to dogs.

WD2Ubisoft, the maker of Watch Dogs 2, initially defended the fireworks, stating on a Reddit forum thread that “While you may find them loud in-game, they are really loud in real life too! The sound carries over the water and you can hear them all over the Bay!”

On the Fourth, though, Ubisoft announced it was silencing the fireworks.

“The people have spoken and we have carried out their will! There was an annoying bug that snuck into our Independence Day Event that made the sound effects from the fireworks noticeable from everywhere on the map. They have been turned off as to avoid any further noise complaints,” a company representative noted on Reddit.

(We’d suggest watching no more than the first two minutes of the video above, which is plenty of time to get the idea.)

” … When you’re playing the game at night for hours and can’t escape the popping no matter where you are, that’s not a positive experience for the player,” a representative admitted. “It’s not possible to rush a fix for this so we made a tough choice to remove them. The heart says no but the ear drums say yes.”

If only the promoters of real fireworks could get that message. Dogs everywhere — and more than a few real life humans — would appreciate it.

Students protest dog killing in video game

                                Scene from “Call of Duty: World at War”

More than 100 students at a private school in Massachusetts have signed a petition protesting the killing of dogs in the video game Call of Duty: World at War.

Breanna Lucci, a 19-year-old student at the Academy of Notre Dame High School in Tyngsboro, Massachusetts, was watching her older brother play the game when she saw him kill a dog.

“My little 12-pound Pomeranian, Winnie the Pooh, is sitting next to him, and I’m thinking, ‘This looks horrible!'” Lucci told the Lowell Sun.

Lucci’s fear that some people might be driven to kill dogs because of Call of Duty led her to start a petition protesting the acts portrayed in the game.

“Killing dogs as a form of entertainment … over and over again…That’s one of the objects of the game,” she said. “Parents need to know what they are buying their kids. Killing animals should not be a form of entertainment.”

Lucci, who is the president of the school’s animal rights club, has gotten more than 100 classmates to sign her petition. She hopes to eventually send it to the game’s maker, Activision-Blizzard.

Lucci’s has also won the support of school faculty, including the moderator of her club, Barbara Vitale, an English teacher who made a point of adding, “We don’t think killing people is a good idea either.”