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Tag: video

Stolen pug reunites with owner

Guido the pug was reunited with his owner in Florida on July 4, more than a month after he was stolen.

The dog was inside the car of his owner, Donald Murray, of Lutz, when it was stolen May 29.

Since then Murray has been desperately trying to find him.

Murray’s car was found abandoned behind a grocery store, and an employee at a dry-cleaning business found Guido wandering around. Another employee there, Karlene Rowell, took Guido home and cared for him.

According to WPTV in Palm Beach, the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office received an anonymous Crime Stoppers tip about the dog that led detectives to the dog’s whereabouts.

When a tip came in, investigators took Murray to Rowell’s house on Tuesday night. He confirmed the dog was Guido.

A sheriff’s spokesman said Rowell and her family were sad to say goodbye, but happy Guido was reunited with Murray.

The sheriff’s office released video of the reunion on Twitter.

Trancing: Zombie-like behavior in dogs is nothing to worry about, scientists say

As “in the moment” as they are said to be, some dogs — like many of we humans — do zone out, and the behavior is nothing to worry about, scientists say.

Pete, the bull terrier above, is trancing, or ghost-walking, and maybe you’ve seen your dog doing the same thing: They stare blankly ahead, or close their eyes, standing either perfectly still or taking small slow motion steps. Most often, this is done in an enclosed space, like a closet, or under a bush.

Caroline Coile, a researcher specializing in canine genetics and behavior at Florida State University, noticed one of her Salukis doing it in her closet. Years later, when she got another Saluki, it did the same thing, except under a backyard bush.

She began researching the behavior and concluded, as others have, that it’s not a disorder, but more like human forms of meditation, Popular Science reports.

Dogs do it because it feels good.

Though many dog owners worry when they see it, though it does look weird, Coile says, “It’s not like they’re in an actual trance where they’re looking into a crystal ball or something. But it does seem like they go into some sort of meditation-like state.”

There does seem to be a tactile element involved. In most cases, dogs seek out a location where they have contact with something, such as clothes hanging in a closet, a curtain, or the fronds of bushes or house plants.

Coile says she believes trancing is more common in some breeds than others, with bull terriers and greyhounds seeming most likely to engage in the behavior, but she adds there is no evidence the behavior is hereditary.

One study published in Veterinary Record found trancing to be “apparently purposeless.”

Alice Moon-Fanelli, a certified animal behaviorist from the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, investigated trancing while studying compulsive tail-chasing in bull terriers.

Moon-Fanelli worried that trancing was yet another manifestation of compulsive disorder in the breed, but trancing appeared to be unrelated, and completely harmless.

“The bull terriers would go under Christmas trees, curtains, towels… anything hanging that would cause dorsal stimulation,” she says. “Their eyes glaze over, and they would go into this slow moonwalk. Then they’d come out of it and be fine.”

So before you rush your dog to the doggie shrink, ask yourself this: Is canine trancing really any more bizarre than the things we humans do to relax and comfort ourselves, or to free and rest our brains — be it taking that Xanax, engaging in some meditation, or watching an episode of Law & Order that we’ve seen ten times?

Dog performing CPR? Not really

To hear some websites tell it, this police dog is actually performing CPR on this fellow officer.

The video was released on Twitter last week by the Municipal Police of Madrid, but the staged demonstration was more an attempt to draw “awwwwwws” than portray any reality.

In the video, an officer drops to the ground, landing on his back. An announcer calls for help and a K-9 responder named Poncho runs to his side, jumping up and down on the officer’s chest.

It may look like he’s performing compression techniques, and checking to see if the officer is breathing, but those are all tricks he has been taught.

Impressive, but not life-saving.

Of course, as with so many viral videos, we don’t always learn the facts until long after the myth they are perpetuating spreads across the globe. The video has been viewed more than 2 millions times.

The Washington Post pointed out the video shows a dog mimicking CPR, not performing it:

Poncho’s performance was a well-done “trick” but not really a first-aid technique, said Ronnie Johnson, lead trainer at Global Training Academy, a training center for K-9s in Somerset, Tex. Police dogs can be taught to do a variety of things, but CPR isn’t one of them. “I don’t think a dog could actually do CPR,” Johnson said, explaining that the lifesaving measure requires precision and strength …

Jonathan Epstein, senior director of science and government relations for the Red Cross, said the video is “cute” but “from a medical perspective, it’s not truly providing CPR.”

Madrid police, in tweeting the video, did little to point out it was all a trick, writing that the “heroic” police dog, named Poncho, “did not hesitate for a moment to ‘save the life’ of the agent.

Woof in Advertising: Butch & the boyfriend

Butch isn’t sure what to make of his master’s new boyfriend, but it’s pretty clear that — for the old dog, anyway — it’s not going to be love at first sight.

In the ad for its 2018 Crosstrek — that’s the extended version above — Subaru shows yet again that when it comes to TV ads that capture the essence of dogs, nobody does it better.

woof in advertisingThe ad depicts a couple going on their first road trip together.

The boyfriend is a little surprised to see that Butch is going along. But during the course of their weekend, he repeatedly tries, unsuccessfully, to win the affection of his new girlfriend’s faithful — and watchful — dog.

Butch remains skeptical until he sees the boyfriend get his master’s jacket for her and wrap it around her shoulders.

At that point, he decides the guy is OK, stops growling at him, and walks over and lays his head on the young man’s knee.

The ads ends with the young woman’s voice — “You can never have to many faithful companions. That’s why I got a Subaru Crosstrek” — and the tagline: “Love is out there; find it in a Subaru Crosstrek.”

Woof in Advertising is a regular feature in ohmidog! that looks at how dogs are used in advertising. For more Woof in Advertising posts, click here.

Blue Heeler on wheels gets the job done

A Blue Heeler in North Dakota is back on the job coralling cattle after losing both his front legs in a farming accident.

“He’s a Blue Heeler, and we call him the wheeler heeler,” the dog’s owner, Korby Kost, told NBC.

Kost owns a feedlot in Carrington. He spent about $5,000 on Patton’s surgeries and equipping him with a custom-made cart.

Patton runs free on the farm, propelling himself with his rear legs, and he keeps the cattle in line.

“He gets their attention. He’ll show them who’s boss,” said Kost.

He made his hallway a ball pit — for his dog

I don’t think you want this guy speaking at your next church function, but the video he made of his Siberian Husky playing amid 5,400 balls is worth a look.

Maybe not a listen — I’ll let you decide that for yourself — but definitely a look.

The man, who calls himself penguinz0 on YouTube, heard his local Toys “R” Us was going out of business, bought 5,400 ball pit balls and filled his hallway with them.

The balls had been marked down to $2 for a pack of 200 — or a penny a piece.

His video, posted Monday, is already nearing 1 million views.

And we’re guessing he’s pretty f—ing happy about that.

Don, the talking dog who started it all

screen_shot_2018-04-20_at_45646_pmleashes1

In this era of talking dogs — from the animated creatures in Wes Anderson’s “Isle of Dogs” to those so easily found “conversing” on the Internet — it might behoove us to remember the first “real” one, the star of a vaudeville act known as Don the Talking Dog.

And since not too many of us were around in 1912 to recall that, we’re fortunate that Smithsonian Magazine writer Greg Daugherty revisited that era and that dog for the magazine recently.

Don the Talking Dog, a setter or pointer from Germany, made his debut in the U.S. in 1912 — during the golden age of vaudeville, the less salty cousin of burlesque, which was traditionally peppered with acts featuring animals doing human things.

There, for a few quarters, you could see rats riding cats around racetracks, dancing elephants, boxing kangaroos, juggling sea lions and monkeys displaying an array of talents.

smithsonianillustrationDon the Talking Dog — proclaimed “the canine phenomenon of the century” — took things a step further. He, or so his name implied, talked.

Only in German, of course. But with a heavy population of German immigrants at the time in New York City, he became a major hit.

He had already garnered attention in Europe by then, with a vocabulary that reached eight words.

His first word was haben (“have” in English), followed by his own name, the word kuchen (cake or biscuit), ja and nein, ruhe (rest) and hunger (which is the same in both languages).

Generally, he didn’t speak in sentences, just one word at a time, and only when prompted by his trainer.

Don arrived in the U.S. in 1912 at the invitation of the vaudeville impresario William Hammerstein.

“Don will sail on the Kronprinz Wilhelm next Wednesday,” the New York Times noted. “A special cabin has been engaged in order to insure his safety.”

When Don’s ship docked, he was greeted by reporters, though they were disappointed not to get any good quotes.

Don stayed in the U.S for the next two years, making appearances in New York and around the country, once performing on the same bill as escape artist Harry Houdini. He then toured the country, performing in Boston, San Francisco, and other cities.

His act consisted of answering a series of questions served up by his regular straight man and interpreter, a vaudeville veteran known as Loney Haskell. Haskell became so attached to Don, according to news reports at that, “that in one-night stands he slept in the dog’s kennel.”

The journal Science, party poopers even back then, didn’t quite buy his act: “The speech of Don is … to be regarded properly as the production of sounds which produce illusions in the hearer.”

screen_shot_2018-04-20_at_45805_pmDespite his dubious skills and limited vocabulary, Don became a pioneering celebrity endorser, for Milk-Bone dog biscuits.

After two years in the U.S., Don retired and returned to his homeland. Haskell once calculated that their stage performances paid Don $92 per word, the equivalent of about $2,300 a word today. He died at home, near Dresden, Germany, in late 1915.

Smithsonian reported, “His last words, if any, seem to have gone unrecorded.”

Other “talking” dogs would follow, including Rolf, a German-born terrier who supposedly communicated by a form of Morse code, and was able to add and subtract, and Queen, who was described as “positively the only dog in the world that speaks the English language.”

Fast forward 100 years and we still have folks making those claims — dog owners, scientists, and entrepreneurs, each group with probably a few hucksters among them, who claim to be on the verge of a device that translates dog to human.

Take them as you would the dogs speaking in this compilation (none of whom can say compilation, by the way) — with a grain of salt.

(Illustrations: Smithsonian Magazine)