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Tag: willow

Gluten sniffing dog “gave me my life back”

can-dogs-smell-gluten

Like many others who suffer from Celiac disease — the most severe form of gluten allergy — Dawn Scheu tried to avoid products containing glutens, store aisles with products containing glutens, and even entire stores where glutens might be lurking.

The last time she “got contaminated,” she said, she spent 10 weeks in and out of the hospital and nearly lost her life.

Now, thanks to a dog, she says she has gotten her life back.

glutendog10To that ever growing list of what dog noses can learn to detect — from bedbugs to cadavers, hidden drugs to impending seizures, explosives to whale poop — it appears we may be able to add glutens.

As Scheu sees it, Celiac sufferers seeking a way to live a normal life may find the answer is “as easy as adopting a dog,” WZZM reports.

Not quite.

One still needs to factor in the training time (six months or more), and the costs of training (as much as $50,000).

And one should bear in mind that Scheu, in addition to being a client of Nosey Dog Detection Partners, is also a partner.

Scheu, who has worked with search and rescue dogs, went in search of a trainer willing to train a dog to sniff out gluten – specifically her dog, a German Shorthaired Pointer named Willow.

“I called 18 companies and trainers before I called Kathy and Kathy said she would try it.”

Dog trainer Kathy Watters initially had doubts. “My thoughts were if there’s gluten everywhere how am I going to train it. It’s in your bird food, it’s in your bug spray, it’s in the Ziploc baggy, the glue.”

After a month of training, Willow appeared to be able to detect glutens, Watters said. Six months later, Scheu says, “I can go out to eat I can do things that I couldn’t do before.”

Willow wasn’t the first dog in America to be trained to detect gluten. A Missouri dog named Elias has been doing it since 2011.

But their own experience led Scheu and Watters to establish Nosey Dog Detection Partners.

Their first customer, though, was seeking to have their family dog, Skittles, trained as a red dye 40 sniffing dog.

Scheu and Watters are working with the family to train Skittles to help eight year old Elizabeth Martin avoid any items containing red dye 40, which the girl has a severe allergic reaction to.

Nosey Dog also plans to train service dogs for veterans with post traumatic stress disorder, people with peanut allergies, as well as diabetic alert dogs and autism assistance dogs.

(Photo: Dave Wasinger / Lansing State Journal)

A dog that can read? You be the judge

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Willow’s owner claims her dog can read — only three phrases, but still.

What do you think? Is the dog actually reading the words? Or is something else at play?