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Tag: woof in advertising

What is it? What is it? What is it?

The video above is:

A. Retired Olympic swimmer Michael Phelps’ latest interspecies race challenger, Chewbacca, in training for their upcoming competition.

B. An advertisement for hair conditioner.

C. Cousin Itt, after falling into The Addams Family pool.

D. An Afhgan hound underwater.

“D” would seem the most obvious answer, given the camera eventually reveals a distinctive snout, but the mermaid-ish way the creature’s arms are stroking is not the least bit dog-like.

woof in advertisingIt’s actually an animation — one of a series of ads for Klarna, a Swedish e-commerce company that provides payment services for online storefronts. It’s intended to depict how “smoothly” their transactions take place.

Get it?

Chief Marketing Officer David Sandström said he and is team were trying to think of the smoothest things possible to feature in a video ad. They eventually landed on the idea of a creature with flowing tresses gliding underwater.

“The hair was a big, big part of it,” he told The Daily Dot.

The video floated around for a year on YouTube, receiving little attention.

But when Klarna shared it last month on Instagram, it quickly went viral as people tried to figure out what exactly the swimming creature was.

That — creating the mystery — was the whole idea behind the ad, Sandström said.

“We want to create a feeling of, ‘What the f–k is this?’ It’s important to us that people don’t understand what it is. The internet loves strange things. The internet loves weird.”

And even people who aren’t sure what it is want to know where they can order one, Sandström said.

“People have emailed us saying they want one and asking where they can get one.”

Woof in Advertising: Quarterback and his dog appear together in State Farm ad

Dogs in advertisements — even those cast in fairly superfluous supporting roles — have a way of stealing the show.

We’d say that’s the case in this new ad from State Farm Insurance, in which Rigsbee totally outclasses the ad’s human stars, Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers stars and his teammate Clay Matthews.

In the ad, Rigsbee and Rodgers find the windshield of Rodgers’ truck has been damaged by a drone.

woof in advertisingThat prompts memories of the seven years of happy times Rigsbee and Rogers shared on the road: Playing football at the beach, driving across sand dunes, hanging their heads out the car windows.

State Farm, of course, shows up to assure Rodgers the truck will be good as new — as does Clay Matthews who, it turns out, was piloting the drone by remote control.

Rigsbee is described in news reports as Rodgers’s dog in real life — but, if so, their trips down memory lane have to be pretty short.

And since the ad shows him both as a pup ad in a full grown state, it can only be surmised that Rigsbee grew up very, very fast.

chancefrankAs of this spring, when Rodgers and actress Olivia Munn were ending their three-year relationship, the couple had two dogs — Chance and Frank. Chance, a Cavalier King Charles spaniel puppy was adopted by Munn, a big proponent of adoption, in 2014. Frank, a Jack Russell terrier mix, joined the couple more recently. Both dogs had their own Instagram accounts.

There’s no mention on social media or in news reports of any Rigsbee before that — so, with Munn taking custody of Frank and Chance, it appears Rigsbee joined Rodgers after the split and, unlike Rodgers, has kept a pretty low profile since.

In any event, the dog described as belonging to Rodgers does a fine job — both the puppy version and the larger version. Between him (them?) and the song, the humans just sort of fade into the background.

The song is Joey Scarbury’s “Believe it or Not,” which might be doubly appropriate for this ad, given the lack of any history of Rigsbee and his phenomenal growth spurt.

(For more of our Woof in Advertising posts, click here.)

Woof in Advertising: Ellen’s dog food has new mascot — and it’s a turd with a halo

There’s a new animated turd in town, and no, it’s not a character on South Park.

Halo dog food, Ellen DeGeneres’ brand, has launched a new advertising campaign featuring a saintly pile of feces know as “Poopsie.”

woof in advertisingThe mascot appears in two advertising spots that have been made so far, both telling us that Halo brand pet foods are free of filler, and that the consumption of it leads to healthier, friendlier, more polite poops.

Halo promises dog owners “a poop that’s a pleasure to scoop.”

It’s not clear what, if any, role, DeGeneres played in conceiving the new mascot for the brand, but the ads were developed by RPA (Rubin Postaer and Associates), an advertising and marketing agency headquartered in Santa Monica, according to AdWeek.com.

mrhankyPoopsie is not the first animated poop to hit the airwaves. That honor, many think, belongs to Mr. Hankey, a talking, sewer-dwelling lump of human feces who first appeared in a Christmas-time episode during the first season of South Park. He went on to become a recurring character.

South Park, however, has been accused of stealing the character from Ren and Stimpy creator John K., who says the cartoon rips off a series of Spumco comics and cartoons that featured “Nutty the Friendly Dump.” The two characters look alike, and the plot lines are similar, too, with the talking feces surfacing to befriend a main character who has been rejected by classmates.

That controversy didn’t make a lot of headlines when it was playing out, back in 1997, so I don’t know, nor do I want to, whether it led to a court battle over who first produced talking poop.

Twenty years later, though I don’t think anybody is going to sue Ellen (because she’s too nice). And the advertising agency is probably in the clear, too, because Poopsie, being coiled, has an entirely different shape than either Mr. Hankey or Nutty. And Poopsie — as much as I would like to call him a spokesturd — doesn’t talk (at least not yet).

In any event, Halo brand has trademarked the name “Poopsie” and the Poopsie image — basically a spiraled piece of poop with eyeballs and a mouth and a golden halo hovering over it.

Poopsie’s point … and it does have one .. is that “the proof is in the poop.”

Dogs who eat Halo brand are avoiding difficult to digest filler and “meat meal,” and as a result they dispense poop that is, if not truly angelic, at least less offensive, the ads contend.

As the next ad says, “the truth always comes out in the end.”

(This link will lead you to more of our Woof in Advertising posts)

Woof in Advertising: Running of the bulldogs

The way they saturate the market, it’s easy to get tired of car insurance ads.

They’ve always tended to air over and over again, until — as imaginative as they might be — we become sick of them.

Perhaps you too have fallen victim to seeing a little too much of the Progressive spokeswoman, or, as I call it, a Floverdose.

Similarly, GEICO’s gecko, cute at first, quickly began grating on my nerves.

woof in advertisingAll this culminates, or at least it does for me, in coming to the decision that I’m not going to be a customer — because their ads annoy me (and because, as much as they spend on advertising, it, somehow, has to be costing me.)

Pretty much every insurance company claims it can save you money — that their rates will save you $318, $412, $562 a year over their competitors — and we all know there’s no way that can be true.

So I no longer look for or expect truth in advertising from car insurance companies; instead I merely expect their commercials to either make me laugh or make me warm and tingly inside — at least until I’ve seen it 20 times.

This new ad from GEICO manages to do both. It’s funny, it’s timely, and it has dogs. Lots of dogs.

On top of that, it’s fresh. The key to keeping viewers from overdosing on a company’s ads is to change them up, which GEICO — though I can’t speak for its insurance — seems to do better than any of the insurance providers.

Their advertising agencies come up with new concepts (otherwise we’d still be watching those cavemen), and provide plenty of variations on continuing themes.

This one, by the Martin Agency, is part of the “what’s not surprising” series. It depicts what looks like is going to be the running of the bulls, but the animals that come charging around the corner in pursuit of the runners are bulldogs.

“The running of the Bulldogs? Surprising. What’s not surprising? How much money Aleia saved by switching to GEICO.”

The actual running of the bulls began earlier this month, ending July 14 at this year’s San Fermin festival in the northern Spanish city of Pamplona.

(This link will lead you to more of our Woof in Advertising posts)

It DOES amount to a hill of beans

There are several things I have long wondered about Bush’s canned beans.

Why do they take up nearly a full half aisle of the grocery store?

How do they get Duke, the dog that appears in commercials with spokesman Jay Bush, to talk?

And what, exactly, is the difference between Bush’s Baked Beans and Bush’s Grillin’ Beans?

It’s time for some answers, America, or at least guesses.

For starters, I’m guessing that the Bush folks are paying off the grocery chains, or at least buying managers some lovely gifts, in order to be granted such large and prominent displays at so many stores.

Next, I am guessing that Duke is not speaking via special effects, but is an actual talking dog, on loan from the prestigious Hollywood Talking Dog Academy to play the role.

woof in advertisingAs for question three — and this is the one I have pondered most — I continue to wrack my brain.

At first, I assumed the Baked Beans were beans that had been baked, or were supposed to be baked, and the Grillin’ Beans were beans that had been grilled, or were supposed to be grilled.

But if they are meant for us to grill them, wouldn’t the Grillin’ Beans just be lost — kind of like the final “g” in grilling — as they fell through the grill slots?

(For you know-it-alls, putting a pot of something atop a grill grate is not grilling, and it’s definitely not grillin’; it is heating up.)

grillinbeans

I did some internet research, and visited the Bush’s website, but the only thing I learned is that Grillin’ Beans have a bolder flavor than the Baked Beans. It’s the same old bean, just in a spicier sauce.

I have no problem with bold and spicy. In fact, I think I prefer the bold and spicy version of Jay in the commercial above to the regular, far blander, version of him. As for Duke, to be honest, I prefer him unadorned, and non-speaking. I’m just not big on talkin’ dogs.

Call me a skeptic, but if you have a talking dog in your ad, I’m not going believe any of the other dubious and far-reaching claims you are making about any of your products. Then again, I’m probably not going to believe them anyway.

I am aware of few other products presented in so many variations as Bush’s Beans — hickory, chipotle, brown sugar, maple, honey, homestyle, country style, original, bold and spicy, vegetarian (meaning they haven’t added bacon) and different combinations thereof. And that’s not even including the products Bush makes from different beanages, such as the black, the kidney and the pinto, the red, the white and the garbanzo.

My theory is that those who make and market the beans figure the more selections they offer, the more grocery shelf space they can grab.

This is by no means strictly a bean thing.

Chips, such as your Pringles and your Doritos, also follow this strategy. And pet foods also use this approach (or perhaps, they led the way). A can of Alpo could be from their Prime Cuts, Chop House, Gravy Cravers or Prime Classics styles. Each one of those comes in multiple flavors, seven for Prime Cuts alone.

One dog food company takes things a step farther, offering more than 200 different products, each supposedly custom designed for a specific breed.
They want us to think that virtually every breed of dog needs a different formula of dog food.

Perhaps you’ve seen this Royal Canin commercial, which tells us that the golden retriever and the yellow Lab — similar as they are — “eat, digest and process energy differently.”

Royal Canin is a ridiculously priced dog food not sold in grocery stores, which is a good thing, because if it were, there would be room for nothing else. Even Bush’s beans would have to clear out. Maybe that’s why it’s not sold in grocery stores.

Or maybe it’s all a marketing gimmick aimed at making us think Royal Canin is such a special, exclusive and high end product it must be purchased from your veterinarian. It’s called a “prescription diet.” It’s nothing of the sort.

Show me, Royal Canin, how Labs and goldens differently digest food, and differently “process energy.” Sure, one of them (sorry, Labs) may generally wolf their meals down more quickly, but aren’t the various tubes and chambers that food goes through on its way out pretty much the same for both breeds?

Why, when I read the ingredients for both, do I notice hardly any difference?

The profusion of flavors in beanage, in chippage, in dog food and everything else, is not new. Remember when there was just one Coke?

And it’s not all about claiming more shelf space. By coming up with a flavor for every mood, companies are able to bring more customers into their folds, and dazzle them with their vast arrays.

Variety may be the spice of life, but it’s all becoming a little much. No longer do we just have to decide between brands, we have to decide within brands, and a trip to the grocery store requires making more choices than election day.

Regular or non-drowsy, diet, sugar-free or light; thick crust or thin crust; smooth or chunky; gluteny or gluten-free; plain or low sodium; regular, spicy, or super spicy.

By the time I get to the checkout line, I’m exhausted, and have used up all my decision making powers for the day.

But I still have to decide whether I want paper or plastic bags, and if I will pay by credit card, debit card, or cash.

Kind of makes me wish I had a dog like Duke I could bring along on shopping trips to tell me what to do. On the other hand, you can’t trust a talking dog, can you?

For more of our Woof in Advertising posts, click here)

But where does she keep her poop bags?

Who says a Jack Russell terrier can’t stop traffic?

In this ad, a Jack Russell on his morning walk manages to turn heads, and even cause a traffic accident, as he trots down the sidewalks and streets of New York City.

Some believe it’s actress/model Emily Ratajkowski — clad in revealing lacy black intimate apparel — that’s causing the uproar.

But we know better.

woof in advertisingThe cheeky (pun intended) ad is for the new DKNY Spring/Summer 2017 intimates, hosiery and sleepwear campaign.

Ratajkowski, who you might remember from her supporting role in “Gone Girl,” wakes up topless, but has the good sense — it is winter, after all — to don a bra before taking her dog on the morning walk.

DKNY says the ad shows, “Anything can happen in New York.”

Upon repeated viewing (necessary for research purposes), we can see it shows a lot more than that.

Clearly the ad is aimed at creating a stir, but as for who it is targeting I can only guess. Men who might be considering gift purchases for a special someone? Women who like to show the world how self-assured they are? Dog lovers, maybe? I’m guessing they don’t all buy long underwear.

The bigger question, though, given no self-respecting New Yorker would venture out with their dog without their poop bags, is where Miss Ratajkowski is carrying hers.

They must be in her boots.

For more of our Woof in Advertising posts, click here.

Dogs are woman’s best friend, too

Of course it goes without saying — that dogs are woman’s best friend, too — but Cesar Canine Cuisine is saying it anyway, in a new advertising campaign that celebrates women and their dogs.

In honor of International Women’s Day, the dog food company launched its “Woman’s Best Friends, Too,” campaign, featuring the ad above and inviting women to share photos and stories about their dogs on a special Facebook page

woof in advertisingThe campaign “highlights the special bond between women and their dogs, and turns the age-old saying of ‘man’s best friend’ on its head,” reads a company press release.

The new campaign was created by advertising agency BBDO San Francisco.

To support the campaign, the brand has teamed up with Elias Weiss Freidman, the photographer behind the popular website and book, The Dogist, to capture the real-life stories of 14 women and their dogs. It has also invited women to submit photos of themselves and their dogs to the campaign’s Facebook page.

womansbest

Cesar is a Mars Petcare brand.

The ad recites the speech that made the phrase “Man’s Best Friend” famous — given in a Missouri courtroom by a lawyer representing a farmer whose dog, Old Drum, was shot and killed by a neighbor in 1869.

George Vest, who would later go on to become a U.S. senator, told the jury that “The one absolutely unselfish friend that a man can have in this selfish world, the one that never deserts him, the one that never proves ungrateful or treacherous, is his dog.”

(Photo: Gloria and her dogs Bo and Rex; by Elias Weiss Freidman / Facebook)

For more of our Woof in Advertising posts, click here.