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Tag: yorkie

Greetings from Bellaville, New Yorkie

I’m a proponent of spending more time with your dog, and less with your computer, but here’s an interesting, and interactive,  presentation from WNYC in New York, which has mapped out not just what breeds dominate the city’s neighborhoods, but what names as well.

Citywide, the top three female names for dogs are Bella, Princess and Lola; the top male names are Max, Rocky and Lucky and the top breeds are Yorkie, Shih Tzu and Maltese.

(Actually the most popular dog in New York is the mutt, and WYNC does report that elsewhere. Somehow they didn’t rate getting on the map, though.)

What’s the most fun though is scrolling through the boroughs to see where Lola tops Lucy, where Buddy beats Buster as the name of choice, and what breeds are, from neighborhood to neighborhood, most predominant. While Yorkies dominate most areas, there are enclaves where Labs and Chihuahuas and pit bulls are owned in the highest numbers. There’s a major English bulldog contingent in lower Manhattan, and pit bulls are the highest in number in Bed Stuy.

The list is based on information WNYC obtained from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, which runs the city’s dog licensing program.

The feature has some other bells and whistles, too, including opportunities to play games and make a t-shirt.

Just after WNYC came out with its map, Gothamist put together an interactive map of its own – this back in January — claiming to show not where the dogs are, but where their poop is, or at least where it’s most complained about. The map shows what neighborhoods have the most barking dog complaints, too.

One wonders what would happen if those two interactive maps were to interact. Would that reveal large dogs named Brutus leave bigger droppings than Chihuahuas named Princess? That Sparky barks more than Snoozy?

Somewhere we have to draw line on all this interactivity with our computers — especially that share of it that’s presenting information that’s just everyday knowledge or common sense or entirely bogus.

In those cases, your time would be better spend interacting with the dog.

Yorkie beaten, boyfriend of actress charged

emmitThe boyfriend of Broadway actress Ashley Yeater has been charged with whipping and kicking her Yorkshire terrier after the 6-pound dog bit him.

Joseph Graves, 30, admitted to investigators he beat the dog, named Emmit, in January, the New York Daily News reports.

“I flew into a rage. Emmit bit me, so I hit him with a belt buckle and kicked him,” prosecutors quote Graves as saying.

Graves took Emmit to a veterinary hospital two days later, after the 4-year-old terrier was vomiting and had stopped eating. Hospital staff, after determining the dog suffered six broken ribs and bruised kidneys, contacted the ASPCA. The dog also lost his left eye as a result of the Jan. 16 attack in Graves’ midtown apartment.

“The pet was nearly killed because a person couldn’t control his temper,” ASCPA spokesman Joseph Pentangelo said. “It’s inexcusable.”

Graves was arrested Monday and charged with aggravated animal cruelty, a felony, and criminal mischief.

Emmit was treated at the West Chelsea Veterinary Hospital and is staying with relatives of Yeater, who was appearing in a Florida performance of a “A Chorus Line” when the dog was beaten.

The disappearing dogs of San Francisco

Dog owners in San Francisco’s Mission District are keeping a tighter leash on their pets in the wake of two recent disappearances — both suspected to be thefts.

“It’s a crime of opportunity,” said Mission police officer Steve Bucy. “Some of these dogs have a high resale value, or they can be trained to fight.”

According to Missionlocal.org — a neighborhood news website developed by the University of California at Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism — two recent cases involve dog owners who were momentarily out of eye contact with their pets.LUCY

Bill McLoed said his family dog, Lucy disappeared last week  near the tennis courts at Dolores Park. The dog was with his step daughter, who was reading a book in the park when she looked up and saw the dog had vanished.

McLoed thought a homeless person might have stolen Lucy,  an 8 year-old border terrier with a limp who has been visiting the park routinely for the last several years, off leash. “They use them for space heaters or to get sympathy,” he said.

After a conversation with San Francisco Animal Control, however, he’s changed his mind. “They said it’s unlikely that Lucy was stolen by a homeless person, that mostly happens in Golden Gate Park where junkies snatch them for ransom.”

Animal Control staff told him that dogs are sometimes lifted just for being off leash, to teach the owner a lesson. “The Shelter said it happens a lot in the Castro,” he added.

CHIRPAAlso about a week ago, Ronnie Salmeron, a bar manager, lost his 3-year old dog, Chirpa. “He had to have been stolen, it happened way to fast,” said Salmeron. “Someone came up to my friend when we were looking, and said they saw someone running away with something in his arms.”

Salmeron has posted more than 600 posters and has launched a Facebook campaign to find his dog.

“A purebred Yorkie, like him, can cost over $2000, and for all I know my dog could be in a fight right now.”

After wife’s highway death, a search for dogs

wyoming

For five straight days, Greg Wong returned to the lonely stretch of highway on Wyoming’s prairie where his wife was killed, searching not for closure but for Sammie and Maddie, the two small dogs traveling with her.

Hours after state police on May 30 called his home in Laramie, notifying him that his wife, Susan, had been killed  on Highway 487, Wong made the first two-hour trip, arriving at 2 a.m., just as a tow truck pulled the SUV his wife had been driving from a deep ravine.

Police told Wong that his wife apparently lost control of the vehicle. It rolled over three times and landed in the ravine. Police told him no dogs were found inside the vehicle, or in the area.

Wong told the Casper Star-Tribune that as soon as he got the news, it was as if he heard his wife’s voice in his head, saying “find the dogs.”

“I guess a lot of it didn’t soak in,” he said. “…You get to that point where you almost turn into a zombie. You are afraid to start thinking about it too much because emotionally you can’t handle it. I kept focusing on ‘you have to find those dogs.’ In a way, I was thinking my last connection to my wife was those dogs.”

Read more »

Dog thief demands ransom in Missouri

Authorities are investigating a report that six dogs were stolen from a Missouri dog shelter by thieves who demanded a ransom for their safe return.

Anna Madsen, 64, who runs the Love a Dog Rescue and Sanctuary near Farmington, says she fears for her dogs, and for her own life.

Madsen says she arrived home Saturday night to find her house in disarray, with one of her old bank statements and a ransom note stuck to a wall with a knife.

The note said six of her dogs had been taken and demanded six figures in cash or the dogs would be killed.

“I guess they thought I had money,” Madsen told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

Madsen said the missing dogs are Gizmo, a Chihuahua and Yorkie mix that was the sanctuary’s mascot; Moses, a Maltese and poodle mix; Lizzi, a rat terrier; Jack, a black and tan Pincher; Jenna Marie, a white Chihuahua with brown spots; and Snickers, a black Chihuahua.

Schneider appeals for safe return of pups

John Schneider has made a radio appeal for the safe return of two puppies stolen with his car from a Los Angeles shopping mall.

“I understand what’s going on in the economy and I understand that… Nobody stole the car because the dogs were in it. If you have been given the gift of two little puppies or even one of our puppies – if you’ve been given the gift out of nowhere… Those puppies really belong to (my children).

Schneider, speaking on Los Angeles radio station KIIS-FM, went on to say:

“I’d very much like for you to consider doing the right thing and getting in touch with Valentine (the DJ of the show on which he appeared), getting in touch with the shelter and getting those puppies back in the Christmas home that they belong in.

“I’m not mad, I’m not gonna point a finger, I’m not gonna tell a tale. I would just like to have our puppies back for Christmas.”

The Yorkiepoo and Yorkshire Terrier – both 10 weeks old — were gifts that Schneider planned to give to his children for Christmas. They were in the back of his Cadillac Escalade when it was stolen from Sherman Oaks’ Fashion Square Mall. The car was later recovered, without the dogs.

Schneider played Bo Duke in the 1980s TV show “The Dukes of Hazzard” and appeared more recently as Superman’s father on the show “Smallville.”

“Superman’s dad would very much like to get his puppies back,” he told the radio station.

John Schneider’s pups stolen from car in mall

Car thieves stole John Schneider’s sport utility vehicle at a suburban Los Angeles mall last week, including two pups that were early Christmas gifts for his children.

The Escalade belonging to the co-star of the old “Dukes of Hazzard” TV show has since been found — but not the dogs, according to an Associated Press report.

TMZ reported that Schneider searched the neighborhood for the 10-week-old dogs, a Yorkie, named Paisley, and a Yorkie-Poodle mix, named Marley. He says he suspects whoever took the SUV is caring for the dogs, or even re-gifting them.