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Tag: terrier

Garbage truck driver in Montana finds a dog in his load; happy ending follows

greatfalls

It’s about 180 miles from Livingston to Great Falls — not far by Montana standards, but a pretty long ride when you’re making the trip in the back of a garbage truck.

That, somehow, is where a little white terrier named Cerb found himself.

It’s the second reported case in recent weeks of a dog being swept up and later discovered in a truck hauling waste. And like that Chihuahua in Maryland we told you about last month, this one has a happy ending, too.

The Great Falls Tribune reported that a driver for Montana Waste Systems looked through an observation window into the back of a truck and saw a dog, floating in the garbage, looking back at him.

The driver, Kyle Meier, was headed from the Livingston Transfer Station to the Great Falls Landfill. He stopped to let the dog out after spotting him.

Meier took the dog to the Great Falls Animal Shelter, where he was nicknamed Livingston — until a check of his microchip showed he was Cerb, short from Cerberus, and hailed from Livingston.

Sherry Morgan, an office clerk at the shelter, said Cerb was unharmed after his ride with the garbage.

After getting Cerb’s chip information, she contacted the Stafford Animal Shelter in Livingston and learned that Cerb’s owners had been looking for him for several days.

Gwen Strachen, the front desk manager at the Stafford shelter, contacted the owners, but they weren’t able to make the trip to Great Falls immediately.

Strachen said a call was put out to volunteers, and a couple headed that way offered to give Cerb a lift.

He’s now back home with his happy owners.

Big probation officer shoots tiny terrier


A 300-pound probation officer in Southwest Georgia, saying he feared for his life, fatally shot a woman’s 12-pound dog last week while on a routine visit to check on her son.

Cherrie Shelton’s two-year-old dog Patches approached officer Antoine Jones as he arrived at her home, she told FOX 31 in Albany.

As she was explaining to the officer that the dog wouldn’t bite, he pulled out his gun and shot the dog, she said.

Patches died 30 minutes later.

Shelton said the officer told her he feared for his life.

patches“He stated that he gave the dog verbal commands to get back but the dog continued to come towards him in an aggressive manner so he fired one shot at the dog using his duty weapon,” a police report on the incident said. The report noted that the probation officer is 6 feet tall and weighs nearly 300 pounds.

The Georgia Dept. of Corrections said in a statement that the officer’s force was justified, and that the officer was “required to use of force against an aggressive canine during a field visit. An incident report was filed and it was determined that the Probation Officer responded appropriately.”

Shelton told FOX 31 she can’t understand why a such a large man would react that way to such a little dog, or why he couldn’t just scare off the dog by kicking his foot or stomping.

The bullet hit Patches on the left side. The dog then walked to the side of the house, where she died 30 minutes later.

Nice work if you can get it



Sorry, this dog wasn’t asleep on the job, we were.

Blame the sheep.

We now know, thanks to a helpful commenter, this is Lamo, a 13-month-old sheep who was hit by a car and taken in by Jennifer Jones, who runs Rockfield Animal Rescue in England.

Being brought up with her three dogs, Lamo thinks he is one, too, she says.

“Lamo is so sure he is a pooch he fetches sticks and balls, wears a collar and a lead, jumps up on his hind legs — and even tries to BARK,” she wrote in posting his video to YouTube.

At least one of the dogs, meanwhile, Judy, apparently thinks Lamo is a dog bed.

Earlier today, we presented the photograph above, indicating the unidentified dog was a working dog and implying — as some other websites did — that possibly he was slacking off while on herding duty.

In truth, it was I who was slacking off — by failing to track down the source of the report.

Generally speaking, that sort of thing comes back to bite you in the butt — kind of like what happens to another one of Jones’s dogs, Poppy, at the end of the video below.

Of ducks and dogs

If that one got you all worked up — what with all that high energy and yapping — here’s one to calm you down again.

Rat terrier finds missing dog in drainpipe

One dog came to the aid of another last week, leading rescuers to a drainage pipe where a 15-year-old miniature schnauzer named Casper had been stuck for up to three days.

The hero? A rat terrier named Rowdy, who belongs to a neighbor.

“He caught the scent and he just started barking, barking, barking,” said Rowdy’s owner, Patty Monk, whose dog led her to the 8-inch wide storm drain pipe in which Casper was stuck.

Seeing Casper inside, Monk, who is friends with Casper’s owners, ran a block to their home and notified them. They sought help from the Sacramento Metro Fire Department.

Firefighters, not wanting to injure the dog, wrapped a teddy bear around the end of a fire hose to push him out the end of the pipe.

Casper’s owners, who had searched for days and put up posters after Casper went missing, took him to a nearby animal hospital to have him checked out.

“We have one of these storm drains right in front of our house. He may have fallen in that one and crawled all the way here, we don’t know,” said Wayne Hernandez.

“We’ve been kind of taking him for granted, he’s been around for so long,” Hernandez told News 10 in Sacramento. “But we’re going to have to try and pamper him a little more. He deserves it after this.”

NY woman says police beat her over dog poop

A New York woman claims two Queens police officers roughed her up during a dispute over whether she failed to pick up her dog’s waste.

Anna Stanczyk, 49, insisted her terrier, Psotka (“prankster” in Polish), had only urinated, and says that the police officers punched her after handcuffing her and pushing her into their patrol car.

The police department’s Internal Affairs division has opened an investigation into her claims, the New York Daily News reports.

Stanczyk’s lawyer said the incident took place Nov. 26.

Stanczyk was confronted in Rockaway Beach by two officers from the 100th Precinct who accused her of not picking up a pile of feces left by her dog. The officers — Shaun Grossweiler, a 4-year veteran, and Richard DeMartino, a 10-year veteran — charged her with disorderly conduct and resisting arrest. Police, in court papers, said Stanczyk caused a ruckus by yelling at them.

Photos taken by her son — printed in yesterday’s Daily News — show Stanczyk, a housewife who emigrated from Poland, with a blackened left eye and a large bruise on her breast. She said she also suffered hand and knee injuries and needs physical therapy.

Pawlitical appointment

They call Hewitt the sixth member of the Snohomish County Council  — and, some suspect, he may be the most energetic and charming one of the bunch.

The county council in Washington state actually has five members, but Hewitt, a black and brown terrier mix, has been a fixture in the council’s eighth-floor office for more than a year, the Daily Herald reports.

Hewitt belongs to County Councilman Dave Somers, who was headed home from work about two years ago when two men pulled alongside in a pickup truck and asked him to take their dog.

“The guy says, ‘Be good to him, give him a good home,'” Somers, who already had three dogs, recalled. “Then they took a left, and they were gone.”

The councilman drove to an animal clinic, where, when asked for the dog’s name, he responded “Hewitt” — the name of the street he was on when the dog was handed over.

After a few months, Somers started bringing Hewitt to work with him — because, he says, the dog liked people so much.

“He could stay at home, but he’s just so much fun,” Somers said. “He enjoys us, and he fits right in. So we’ve settled into a routine here.”

(Photo by Dan Bates / The Herald)