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Tag: rescue

Police in Ohio arrest woman they say was responsible for writing on, abandoning dog

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Police in Ohio have charged the woman they say was responsible for abandoning a dog in a park with the words “free” and “good home only” written on her in permanent marker.

Ross County authorities identified the woman as Kendra Stafford of Chillicothe. She faces charges of animal cruelty and animal abandonment, WSYX in Columbus reported.

The dog, a 6-month-old lab mix taken in by the Ross County Humane Society, was renamed Marvela and quickly adopted after being found in a crate in a local park.

Stafford’s expected to be arraigned in Chillicothe Municipal Court on June 8th.

Initial news reports offered no information on how police were able to track her down.

Court records show Stafford has also been accused of endangering her children. Three years ago, they were temporarily taken out of her custody.

(Photo: Ross County Humane Society)

“Good Home Only” written on head of abandoned dog found in Ohio

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One thing is clear about the dog found crated at a park in Ohio with the words “Free” and “Good Home Only” written on her in permanent marker.

She certainly wasn’t in a good home before.

The dog was found abandoned and in a crate in a park in Chillicothe, according to Brittany May, of the Ross County Humane Society.

The female Lab mix, estimated to be around six months old, had “Free” written on one of her sides, “Good Home Only written on her head” and something unintelligible on her other side

mARV2leashes1The humane society named the dog Marvella, according to ABC6.

May said in a Facebook post that most of the permanent marker had been gotten off the dog’s coat.

May posted the photos to her personal Facebook page, adding that whoever had done this to the dog had reached “a whole new level of LOW!”

Anyone interested in adopting Marvella, can find out more information about the Ross County Humane Society website.

She will be available for adoption Wednesday.

(Photos: Courtesy Ross County Humane Society)

Here’s the poop on the new royal dog


After this weekend’s royal wedding — which I was about as interested in as I am in, well, royal anything — there’s a new dog in the royal family: a once down and out Kentucky beagle named Guy.

I avoided coverage of the wedding of Meghan Markle and Prince Harry like the plague, instantly flipping away from any channel that mentioned it, but in my efforts to stay on top of dog news, I couldn’t miss this.

Much like the marriage of the American actress and the prince, Guy’s story is “a total fairytale,” said Alison Preiss of Pet Valu, the Ontario pet store where Guy was adopted by Markle in 2015.

“Here is this dog that was in a shelter, nobody wanted him, and through this wonderful adoption he’s now living in a palace, running around with the royal family.”

Guy was a stray who had been picked up in the woods and held in a Kentucky shelter. It was a kill shelter, and Guy’s days were numbered when shelter staff contacted Dolores Doherty, who runs an Ontario-based rescue called A Dog’s Dream. The organization focuses on saving beagles scheduled to be euthanized.

Guy was shipped to Toronto and ended up, the day after his arrival, being featured at an adoption event at a Pet Valu store.

Among those who showed up at the store that day was Markle, who adopted him. Markle at the time was living in Toronto while her TV series, Suits, was being filmed there.

Doherty had never heard of Markle, but the next thing she knew Guy started showing up in Instagram posts.

New of Markle’s engagement to Prince Harry, Doherty said, was “just beyond my wildest imagination. How is that for a rags to riches story from a good old Kentucky beagle?”

guyandbogartIn November, Prince Harry’s communication secretary confirmed that Guy had moved to the UK and was living with Markle, The Guardian reported. Her other dog, Bogart, is believed was too old to make the journey is staying with Markle’s close friends.

Guy was photographed over the weekend, riding in the back seat with the queen.

Doherty said about 1,600 dogs have been adopted through her organization.

“The dogs that have come up here have really impacted a lot of lives. So there’s a lot of happy endings, but his certainly is the most outstanding.”

(Photos: At top: Markle’s dogs Guy and Bogart, by Meghan Markle / Instagram; lower Guy, spotted riding in the backseat with Queen Elizabeth II / Twitter)

Saved from the lava: Rescue efforts continue as more eruptions are predicted

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Dogs on Hawaii’s Big Island continue to be rescued from the unpredictable flows of lava that have spewed from the Kilauea volcano since its eruption last week.

Many pets are said to have bolted away from their homes during the earthquake that preceded the eruption, and more have been lost during evacuations.

Further eruptions are being predicted in the days ahead.

“It’s a sad situation,” said Adam Pereira, the shelter manager at the Hawaiian Island Humane Society told BuzzFeed. “They had to evacuate so fast and lots of people thought they’d go back the next day.”

The Hawaii Island Humane Society combed through every street in Leilani Estates last Tuesday looking for pets still remaining in the neighborhood. It was the third mission to retrieve animals since the area was evacuated on Thursday.

The first time the humane society went into the evacuated zone on Saturday, it retrieved six dogs and two tortoises.

One woman recovered her two dogs, missing for 10 days, on Sunday, after they were found near a lava vent.

cani-eruzione-kilauea-2-281x300Carol Hosley, who was being evacuated by firemen at her Leilani Estates, said Brus, a Jack Russel-pug mix, fled the house as she was packing up her things. Little Dude, a black terrier mix, followed close behind him

Hosley adopted Brus from Aloha Ilio Rescue six months ago, and that group aided in his rescue, according to HawaiiNewsNow.com.

“We’ve been looking for him for 10 days, and we’ve just kept going back, and going back,” said Daylynn Kyles, president of Aloha Ilio Dog Rescue. Kyles, accompanied by two friends, finally found the dogs on Sunday, trapped between a cooled lava flow and a fence line.

“They were stuck behind a fence, and they couldn’t get out because the lava had surrounded them,” Kyles said. “It was crazy.”

Kyles and her companions had to crawl through the grass and over the fence line to reach the dogs who were badly shaken, and bitten by red ants.

cani-eruzione-kilauea“We just knew this dog was probably just terrified, he was truly stuck, he couldn’t get out,” Kyles said.

Kyles said they were searching near the 17th fissure, and could hear the ground rumbling.

“It sounded like a freight train. You just heard these constant, big booms.”

Brus and Little Dude are recovering at Aloha Ilio while Hosley tries to find more permanent housing.

“I’m just thrilled to death, I just couldn’t be happier,” Hosley said. “The other stuff is stuff, but I got the dogs.”

(Top photo, U.S. Geological Survey; lower photos of Brus and Little Dude, courtesy of Aloha Ilio Rescue)

Thief snatches trailer New Mexico rescue group used for adoption events

The theft of a trailer loaded with pet supplies Saturday means some dogs will wait a little longer for homes, and that an Albuquerque rescue group called the People’s Anti-Cruelty Association is going to have to rebuild.

The trailer was parked at a street corner where the nonprofit volunteer group holds adoption events every Saturday.

Sometime during the night, thieves hauled it away, along with the paperwork, leashes, pet food and other supplies inside, KOB in Albuquerque reported.

“When they stole our trailer it has greatly, greatly hindered our ability to (help animals) because if we can’t find it and its contents, we’re going to have to start all over,” said Arnielle Fernandez, a volunteer with PACA. “And that is very pricey.”

“Everything that was in the trailer was like crates that we set up for our dogs, our collars, our leashes, some dog food. Puppy pens, blankets, you know, towels – everything we need to function,” Fernandez said. “Ordinarily we, throughout the years, we have found permanent loving homes for thousands of dogs and cats.”

The group is now asking the public to keep an eye out for the trailer, which is white and has paw print decals, along with the PACA logo.

“Ask them to bring it back. That would be wonderful. It would be like Christmas in May,” Fernandez said.

While the group works to plan another event this weekend, Fernandez said it will be more difficult to pull off.

“Anybody that is in such a horrible state, on a personal level, that would do something like that to a non-profit rescue organization – they’re of very, very little character,” she said.

Are dog rescue groups helping support big time breeders? It sure looks that way

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Are animal rescue groups actually helping keep big-time dog breeders — both good ones and bad ones — in business?

That’s the question raised in this blockbuster report that appeared in The Washington Post this morning.

The newspaper’s investigation found that rescue operations, traditionally the nemesis of puppy mills, have been buying dogs from breeders at auction, using donations from their supporters to buy dogs in what it described as a “nationwide shadow market.”

The result is a river of rescue donations flowing from avowed dog saviors to the breeders, two groups that have long disparaged each other. The rescuers call many breeders heartless operators of inhumane “puppy mills” and work to ban the sale of their dogs in brick-and-mortar pet stores. The breeders call “retail rescuers” hypocritical dilettantes who hide behind nonprofit status while doing business as unregulated, online pet stores.

But for years, they have come together at dog auctions where no cameras are allowed, with rescuers enriching breeders and some breeders saying more puppies are being bred for sale to the rescuers.

Bidders affiliated with 86 rescue and advocacy groups and shelters throughout the United States and Canada have spent $2.68 million buying 5,761 dogs and puppies from breeders since 2009 at the nation’s two government-regulated dog auctions, both in Missouri, according to invoices, checks and other documents The Post obtained from an industry insider.

Most rescuers then offered the dogs for adoption as “rescued” or “saved,” and charge adoption fees that range from $50 to $1,000 per dog.

The article reports that it is likely the success of rescue groups in reducing the numbers of dogs needing adoption that has led to an increase in such organizations turning to buying dogs offered at auctions by commercial kennels: “As the number of commercial kennels has decreased, so has the number of shelter animals killed in the United States: A February 2017 estimate put the total for dogs alone at 780,000, a steep drop from estimates for all shelter animals that were as high as 20 million in the 1970s.”

One golden retriever rescue group turned to the auctions after seeing 40 percent fewer dogs coming in as of 2016. At the auctions, such rescuers describe buying purebreds and popular crossbreeds such as goldendoodles and maltipoos as “puppy mill rescue,” the article notes.

Some rescue organizations have paid more than $1,000 for a single dog.

Animal-welfare groups, including the ASPCA, HSUS, say rescuers are misguided in buying dogs at auction because the money they pay only encourages more breeding on a commercial scale.

While they may be keeping some individual dogs from being purchased by breeders for a life of breeding, they are also lining the pockets of breeders and helping to create a “a seller’s market.”

JoAnn Dimon, director of Big East Akita Rescue in New Jersey, says that buying breeding-age dogs at auctions makes it harder for commercial breeders to profit in the long run: “That breeder is going to make thousands of dollars off that [female dog] if he breeds her every cycle. I just bought her for $150. I just took money out of his pocket. I got the dog, and I stopped the cycle.”

The majority of the $2.68 million The Post documented was spent since 2013 at Southwest Auction Service, the biggest commercial dog auction in the country, with some additional spending at its smaller, only remaining competitor, Heartland Sales.

As the last remaining government-licensed auctions, they let buyers and sellers see hundreds of dogs at a time and are a legal part of the country’s puppy supply chain. They are regulated by the U.S. and Missouri Departments of Agriculture and open to the public.

“I’m not going to lie about this: Rescue generates about one-third, maybe even 40 percent of our income,” Bob Hughes, Southwest’s owner, told the Post. “It’s been big for 10 years.”

“I honestly think there are very good, responsible rescues that just love the dogs and want to get them out of the breeding industry,” he added. “And I think there are malicious, lying, cheating rescues that are in it for the money and the glory and the funding.”

Rescue groups generally are organized as nonprofit charities and raise money through fundraisers, adoption fees, grants and bequests. Shelters and rescue groups connected to the auction bidders have annual revenue that runs from $12,000 to $1.5 million.

Hughes told the Post that what happens at auctions shows that nobody has the moral high ground in America’s puppy wars.

“In their minds, the rescuers think they’re better,” he says. “The industry is all alike. We’re all supplying puppies and dogs to the general public in some form or fashion.”

(Photo: Dogs being sold at an auction in Michigan))

Perfectly imperfect: Picasso the dog honored for showing what beauty really is

Picasso, the rescued dog with a twisted snout, was honored by the Oregon Humane Society for showing the world how perfect one with an imperfection can be.

At a ceremony In Portland last week, the 2-year-old pit bull-Chihuahua-Pomeranian mix received a Diamond Collar Hero Award.

The awards honor animals and people who have acted to save a human or animal life in peril, performed services within the community with undying loyalty, or overcome incredible odds in order to survive.

Picasso and his brother were picked up as strays in southern California. They were on the list to be euthanized when Liesl Wilhardt, the founder and executive director of Luvable Dog Rescue, pulled them out and brought them to Eugene last year.

She later decided to keep both as her own, unwilling to let them be separated because of Picasso’s devotion to his brother.

picasso11Picasso and Pablo quickly became part of her extended dog family, and Picasso became an Internet sensation as well — both for his story of survival and his unique appearance.

“Picasso has overcome challenges that most dogs don’t ever have to, from surviving an assaulter to living on the streets. And he’s done it all with courage and grace,” Wilhardt says. “Picasso’s personality and temperament is just loving and accepting to all living things, despite what he’s suffered in the past.”

Pablo died in October from a brain aneurysm, according to the Eugene Register-Guard. Picasso, unlike his brother, was born with his facial deformity.

Picasso is now in training to become a therapy dog, but he has already touched many lives

“He really does touch people, especially those who look a little different like him,” Wilhardt said. “Whether they were born different or had an illness or accident that led them to looking different, he’s helped and inspired so many people.”

Those offering him praise and thanks include soldiers with disfiguring wounds and children coming to terms with looking different.

Picasso also has been nominated for a 2018 American Humane Hero Dog Award, an annual nationwide competition that searches out and recognizes “America’s Hero Dogs.”

People can see the nominees and vote for an American Humane Hero Dog Award at herodogawards.org/vote.