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Tag: puppies

Sunday’s Puppy Bowl XIV will feature dogs left homeless by hurricanes

tylerThis Sunday’s Puppy Bowl will feature adoptable dogs who were left homeless by natural disasters.

This year, Animal Planet is featuring pups rescued from areas that were devastated by natural disasters last year in Houston, Puerto Rico, Florida, and Mexico.

The network worked with 48 different animal shelters and rescue organizations from 26 U.S. states in putting together the teams for this year’s big game, which will feature the most pups in Puppy Bowl history.

About half of them were victims of hurricanes and other natural disasters who ended up in shelters and rescues — like Tyler (above), who was left homeless by Hurricane Harvey.

Puppy Bowl XIV will air on Animal Planet at 3 p.m. Sunday.

It will also include some special need dogs, like Ryder, a sight-impaired husky; Chance, a deaf dalmatian; Moonshine, a sight-impaired and deaf border collie; and Luna, a Pomeranian mix with a cleft palate.

On Saturday at 8 p.m., Animal Planet will air its first Dog Bowl, featuring more mature dogs in need of homes.

You can learn more about the program, view starting lineups at the Animal Planet website.

Grammy puppies-for-the-losers gag falls flat

At the 60th annual Grammy Awards on Sunday night, host James Corden handed out puppies to the losers in the Best Comedy Album category.

Yuk. Yuk.

Amid all that self-righteousness about the “Me Too” too movement, all those white roses to show solidarity, and all that trying way too hard to make a point about exploitation of the vulnerable by rich and powerful show business figures, Corden’s boneheaded idea was to hand out puppies as booby prizes, apparently having no clue just how hypocritical that stunt was.

Not only did it put some very young dogs in a fearful and stressful situation, it sent a pretty revolting message at the same time — that dogs are property, or at least comedy props.

News media on the day after seemed to be going along with the stunt, portraying the dogs as actual gifts, and not one lifting a finger to find out where the dogs came from, or report on where they ended up.

EBL News, in one of the most insipid reports, called the use of the dogs “hilarious and darling.” Entertainment Tonight reported that “those adorable consolation prizes” all went home with their trainer.

The puppy distribution came after Dave Chappelle’s win for the Best Comedy Album.

“Congratulations Dave Chappelle. Now I should say to all the nominees this evening who are not going home with a Grammy … I don’t want anybody to be upset tonight,” Corden said. “So the good news is, nobody goes home empty handed, because all night we’ll be handing out consolation puppies. Okay, so if you didn’t get a Grammy, you get a puppy!”

Handlers then delivered puppies to the losers — Jerry Seinfeld, Jim Gaffigan and Sarah Silverman.

PETA, in a statement, said the stunt showed how out of touch Grammy organizers are.

“It’s beyond belief that Grammy organizers are so out of touch with the issues of the day that they failed to grasp what is now commonly understood: that dogs are intelligent, complex animals — not toys, props, or prizes. While the stress of being passed around under bright lights by strangers may have been upsetting for these young pups, using them as prizes for runners-up sent a dangerous message to viewers that dogs aren’t the family members for life that they should be. In a country where millions of homeless dogs are waiting in shelters every year and are euthanized because there simply aren’t enough good homes for them, this stunt is no joke.”

Sarah Silverman later tweeted that she fell in love with her puppy at first sight, whereas Jim Gaffigan tweeted, “That dog was delicious.”

The sad part is, it could haven been a stunt that worked. It could have used adoptable pups. It could have made a point about adoption. It could have alerted and assured viewers that dogs were humanely treated and weren’t being handed out willy nilly, as if they were parting gifts for the also-rans.

We have more empathy for dogs than we do for most humans, study says

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People are more empathetic towards dogs than they are their fellow humans — unless that human is an infant, a new study has concluded.

In the study, 240 students were shown fake newspaper clippings about attacks with baseball bats that left the victims unconscious, with a broken leg and multiple lacerations.

Then they were asked questions aimed at gauging their empathy for the fictional victims in the account they had read — either a one-year-old baby, a 30-year-old adult, a puppy, or a six-year-old dog.

While the human infant evoked the most empathy, the puppy trailed closely behind, then the adult dog, with the adult victim finishing last.

The study was published this week in the journal Society and Animals.

The study was similar to one conducted two years ago by Harrison’s Fund, a medical research charity in the UK.

In that one, two printed two advertisements were show to people, both of which asked: “Would you give £5 to save Harrison from a slow, painful death?” In one of the advertisements Harrison was a child, in the other he was a dog.

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Harrison the dog got significantly more clicks than Harrison the human, the Times of London reported.

The newer study found people are consistently more distressed by reports of dogs being beaten up than they are by the same reports about adult humans.

The scientists, from Northeastern University in Boston, found that those who who read the report about an attack on a child, dog or puppy all registered similar levels of empathy. When it was a human adult, however, the results were different.

“Subjects did not view their dogs as animals, but rather as ‘fur babies,’ or family members alongside human children,” the researchers concluded.

Fraud runs rampant in online pet sales

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If you’re planning to search online to buy a new dog, be warned: Up to 80 percent of the sponsored advertising links that will show up — like that one above for instance — may be fraudulent.

So might that particular photo of a particularly cute puppy, those purebred “papers” that the seller promises to send along, that pastoral setting in which a breeder’s kennel is supposedly located. And the dog being advertised? It might not even exist at all.

The Better Business Bureau last week issued a report warning that online pet sales scams are “victimizing Americans at an alarming rate.”

A growing demand for dogs and an increase in shopping online have combined to give scammers an unprecedented opportunity to promise to sell you a dog, and leave you much poorer and petless.

The BBB advises extreme caution — and never buying a dog from a breeder without visiting that breeder. Don’t let yourself fall in love with a photo and, as with online dating, be careful of getting your heart broken.

Fake pet sales have become so common that the attorneys general of three states — Ohio, Arizona and Virginia — have issued warnings to residents in the past year, the Washington Post reported last week.

The BBB report says many of the suspected fraudulent websites offering dogs are based in the West African nation of Cameroon, and that Cameroonians residing in the U.S. are being used to collect the money from victims through Western Union and MoneyGram outlets.

Several recent cases prosecuted in the United States involve links to Cameroon, including three Pennsylvania university students accused in May of peddling nonexistent boxer puppies online.

The BBB says a high number of victims of online pet marketing schemes are in their late teens or 20s

Such schemes are usually dependent on bogus, often sophisticated, advertisements to hook unsuspecting consumers.

“In the current digital age, it is no surprise that the first step in many people’s search for a new pet begins with the internet. Alas, even the most careful online search is likely to put a consumer in contact with a potential thief. Reports show there are thousands of people around the country, and the world, who have become victims of puppy scams, and many of these typically begin with a fake web site and stolen photos, often taken from a legitimate site,” the report said.

Greedy “sellers” rarely are satisfied with collecting a deposit; most will demand additional payments until the buyer finally becomes suspicious or runs out of funds.

The scammers often hit the prospective “buyers” with additional charges before any dog is even shipped.
While avoiding any in-person meeting with a potential buyer, they ask victims to send money to a supposed third party who will take over responsibility for transporting the animal. In addition to creating phony websites to advertise the animals, the thieves will develop bogus websites that appear to be legitimate transport companies.

Those who pay for pet shipping often are asked to buy or rent a special crate for the pet and requests for special insurance or shots for the animals. At times, the thieves may claim the pet is stuck at an airport in transit and additional money is needed for food and water.

If a customer balks, the fraudsters might inform them that, unless more money is forthcoming, the potential buyer could be charged with “animal abandonment.”

In one typical case a customer named Yahong Zheng of Omaha, Neb., ordered two huskies from the website huskieshaven.com. He forked over $1,200 and was asked for additional money before realizing it might be a scam.

Kanetria Hutcherson found a teacup Yorkie on the website usa.globalfree-classified-ads.com and wired the company a $195 shipping fee to transport the animal. Soon after wiring the $195 fee through MoneyGram, Hutcherson received an email appearing to be from Delta Air Cargo, claiming the animal needed a special crate before it could be put on the plane. She wired an additional $240.

After that she was told the dog had been transported as far as Oklahoma City, and she was instructed to purchase health insurance for the dog at an additional cost of $980. Later she received another email from Delta Air Cargo that asked for another $200; one instructing her to pay $150 for food and water for the animal; and another informing her the dog neeed to be quarantined at a cost of $1,900.

Not until she called the real Delta Air Cargo was she certain she was being duped.

Delta Air Lines last week filed a lawsuit against what it called a “bogus” site that dupes people into believing it provides pet transport services on Delta jets. The site is called DeltaPetTransit.com.

By then she’d paid nearly $1,000 for a dog originally advertised as free. While the dog was said to belong to a family in Baltimore, the same photo, it turns out, was used to advertise a puppy for sale in Florida, Texas, the U.K., New York, and Hungary.

The BBB Study suggests the actual numbers of pet fraud may be even higher than reported, because many victims either choose not to file complaints or do not know where to turn for help. BBB ScamTracker contains 907 reports on this type of fraud, which represents 12.5% of all their complaints involving online purchase fraud.

The Federal Trade Commission in 2015 found 37,000 complaints involving pets, and the vast majority of those are believed to be pet sales scams.

More information about pet sales scammers can be found at the website petscams.com, which tracks scamming reports victims and lists websites that have been linked to scammers.

Some older dogs will get a chance in the lead-up to next year’s Puppy Bowl

After 13 years of celebrating youthful dogs in their annual “Puppy Bowl” extravaganza, Animal Planet is finally going to give older dogs a chance to show off their stuff.

Leading up to Puppy Bowl XIV, the network will show the “Dog Bowl,” a one-hour special hosted by Jill Rappaport that — while it may not prove to be as rambunctiously action-packed as the Puppy Bowl — is aimed at giving older dogs a chance to be adopted.

Its contestants won’t be limited to senior dogs, but the program will feature adult dogs living in rescues and shelters.

The program likely won’t be the ratings grabber that the Puppy Bowl has been as an alternative to the Super Bowl. And it may not satisfy an audience seeking mega-doses of playful cuteness.

But it will likely lead to some calmer, wiser, been-around-the-block-a-time-or-two dogs finding forever homes.

And that’s what the Puppy Bowl is all about. Well, that and ratings. Well, that and ratings and advertising and sponsoring.

“Puppy Bowl’s goal is to promote animal adoption so as many animals as possible can find their forever homes,” Patrice Andrews, General Manager of Animal Planet, says in a release.

The formula — dogs competing on a miniature football field — has proven to be a succesful one, both in terms of ratings and in leading its contestants to get adopted.

As is the case with any successful TV show, it’s now being duplicated. Hallmark’s Kitten Bowl will be back for its fourth year.

And then there’s National Geographic’s Fish Bowl, which we’re pretty sure isn’t about adoptions at all.

The new Dog Bowl will be part of Animal Planet’s Road to the Puppy Bowl coverage. It’s good to see the makers of Puppy Bowl branching out and becoming a little more inclusive and diverse.

Last year’s Puppy Bowl featured a three-legged pup and two other special needs dogs — one deaf and one sight and hearing impaired.

It’s about time more mature dogs got some attention, especially in an industry that is so focused on youth, be it human or canine.

After all, an older dog can still be pretty entertaining.

(Video: A promotion for Animal Planet’s 2017 Puppy Bowl, which turned out to be the second highest rated ever)

Watching this eclipse won’t melt your eyes — only your heart

For those of you who missed the Great American Eclipse — aka the day the moon photobombed the sun — here, via Twitter, is a highly scientific reenactment, staged by two pug puppies and their owner(s).

When one foster dog becomes 19 foster dogs — overnight

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A Missouri woman trying to save one dog’s life has saved 18 more — all born Sunday when the golden retriever-Chow mix she was fostering gave birth.

Ashlee Holland took the dog into her home as a foster through the rescue group Midwest Animal ResQ, which pulled her from an area shelter as the deadline neared for her to be euthanized.

And while Holland knew the dog, named Ava, was pregnant, she wasn’t expecting the outpouring of pups that took place, starting Sunday night and not ending until Monday morning.

“It’s overwhelming. It’s incredible. I didn’t just save one life, I saved 19. It’s amazing,” Holland told Fox 4 News in Kansas City.

Holland started fostering Ava about two weeks ago.

She said her nine-year-old son named all the pups after Kansas City Royals players.

Ava and her pups will be available for adoption through Midwest Animal ResQ.

Holland has created an Ava and her 18 Royals Facebook page for those interested in following Ava and her pups.

(Photo: Ava gets a much needed break from her 18 pups, from Facebook)